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Amtrak: See photos of trains through the years

Long before airplanes were a commonly used form of long-distance transportation, there was the train.

On May 1, 2016, Amtrak marked its 45th year of service across the country.

amNewYork took a look at Amtrak's storied history and its many trains through the years.

Take a look at these Amtrak trains rolling through history.

Clocker train

On May 1, 1971, Amtrak service begins with
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1Te5ipT" target="_blank">Drew Jacksich via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

On May 1, 1971, Amtrak service begins with the Clocker as the first train operated by the company. In this photo, an Amtrak Clocker train pulls out of the 30th Street station in Philadelphia in May 1976, heading to New York.

Metroliner train

Designed by Budd, the Metroliner was a high-speed
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1TVDgcU" target="_blank">Bengt 1955 via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

Designed by Budd, the Metroliner was a high-speed electric car that could reach speeds of up to 110 mph. In 1972, Amtrak offered 11 daily Metroliner Service trains between Penn Station and Boston and 14 daily trains between New York and Washington, D.C.

Superliner I train

Though the Superliner I entered the development phase
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1Xx8OMi" target="_blank">Jack Snell via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

Though the Superliner I entered the development phase in 1971, the bi-level trains weren't introduced until 1979. The initial contract with Pullman Standard included 102 coaches, 48 coach-baggage cars, 25 cafe/lounge cars, 70 sleeper cars and 39 diner cars.

RTG Turboliner train

The RTG Turboliner, based on a French turbine
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1rRNAMZ" target="_blank">Lawrence and David Barera via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

The RTG Turboliner, based on a French turbine train, was introduced in 1973 on Amtrak's Chicago-St. Louis route. It could reach speeds of up to 125 mph.

Amfleet I train

The design of the Amfleet I cars was
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1Ti3dEg" target="_blank">Jack Snell via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

The design of the Amfleet I cars was based on the Metroliner due to its popularity among customers. Introduced in 1975, the single-level train took its maiden voyage on a route between Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. Constructed by Budd, the trains could reach speeds of up to 125 mph.

Amfleet II train

Used mainly for long-distance, overnight routes, the Amfleet
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1smUGsS" target="_blank">Bruce Fingerhood via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

Used mainly for long-distance, overnight routes, the Amfleet II cars were ordered by Amtrak in 1980. Budd manufactured the 125 coaches and 25 food service cars. The trains looked similar to Amfleet I cars on the outside but had a different interior layout.

Amtrak's executive sleeper service railcar

Amtrak's Chris Byrne and Markus Moore talk over
Photo Credit: Newsday / Dan Neville

Amtrak's Chris Byrne and Markus Moore talk over preparations outside the company's executive sleeper service car before its trip from New York to Washington, D.C., in November 1985. The sleeper car held 22 passengers who were able to sleep in the train for part of the night before leaving for Washington early in the morning.

Horizon railcar

In 1989 Amtrak bought 104 Horizon cars from
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1Yz2UZf" target="_blank">Charles Fulton via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

In 1989 Amtrak bought 104 Horizon cars from Bombardier. They were the first short-distance cars the company bought since 1977. The Horizon cars were also the first to be purchased without federal funding.

Superliner II railcar

Following the success of the Superliner I, Amtrak
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/24XjjKQ" target="_blank">Paul Sullivan via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

Following the success of the Superliner I, Amtrak placed a $340 million order for 140 more cars in 1991. The order included 38 coaches, 47 transition sleeper cars, 25 lounge cars, 30 dining cars, 49 sleeping cars and six deluxe sleepers. Constructed by Bombardier, the cars were delivered to Amtrak in 1996.

X2000 train

Amtrak's X2000 train at Penn Station in New
Photo Credit: Newsday / Jim Cummins

Amtrak's X2000 train at Penn Station in New York City on Jan. 27, 1993. The train, which held 197 passengers and had a top speed of 150 mph, was said to have cost Amtrak upwards of $20 million.

The ICE: Intercity Express train

Amtrak unveiled its ICE (Intercity Express) Train at
Photo Credit: Newsday / Alan Raia

Amtrak unveiled its ICE (Intercity Express) Train at Penn Station on Oct. 4, 1993. The German-made train had a top speed in Europe of 175 mph.

Viewliner I train

The Viewliner I was introduced in 1996. Built
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1WBrZFP" target="_blank">kenficara via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

The Viewliner I was introduced in 1996. Built by Morrison Knudsen through a $100 million contract, this long-distance, single-level model is known for its two-row windows.

Viewliner II train

Manufacturer CAF USA built 130 new single-level, long-distance
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1Yz5crh" target="_blank">Charles Fulton via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

Manufacturer CAF USA built 130 new single-level, long-distance Viewliner II cars, which were meant primarily for use on the East Coast and introduced in July 2010. The order included 25 dining cars, 55 baggage cars, 25 sleepers and 25 duel baggage-dormitory cars.

Heartland Flyer train

In 2010, the Heartland Flyer was named one
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/22f9pTb" target="_blank">Kurt Haubrich via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

In 2010, the Heartland Flyer was named one of Time magazine's 50 best inventions of the year. It runs on 20 percent biodiesel fuel.

Acela Express train

The Acela Express, launched in 2000, is meant
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1TlKdH6" target="_blank">Derek Yu via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

The Acela Express, launched in 2000, is meant to compete with airlines for those who travel between New York, Washington and Boston. In its first full year the Acela Express carried about 1 million travelers.

P-42 locomotive No. 42

In 2013 Amtrak unveiled a P-42 locomotive that
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1Xxbolb" target="_blank">Jack Snell via Flickr (CC BY-SA)</a>

In 2013 Amtrak unveiled a P-42 locomotive that was painted red, white and blue in honor of U.S. veterans and to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. The locomotive also has a special logo on the side that reads "America's Railroad Salutes Our Veterans."

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