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Eat and Drink

Move over kale. The next trendy vegetable is...

Kale will never go out of style in these health-conscious times, but the "it vegetable" trend will also never die. Face it, the kale salad is over. So what's next?

Spigarello

Mario Batali said this cruciferous vegetable native to
Photo Credit: FLICKR/ Linda

Mario Batali said this cruciferous vegetable native to Southern Italy is the new kale at a Master Class talk at the Heart Tower on Monday, Sept. 29. And you can’t say that he doesn’t know what he’s talking about…

A member of the broccoli family, spigarello is an heirloom variety that’s considered to be the "parent" of broccoli rabe. It’s not bitter like rabe, rather, it’s grassy and sweet.

Lollipop Kale/ BrusselKale

In the age of Cronuts and Ramenrritos, it
Photo Credit: FLICKR/ Rain Rabbit

In the age of Cronuts and Ramenrritos, it should come as no surprise that we have a mash-up vegetable. New to the produce market in 2014, this Brussels sprouts and kale combination is also referred to as lollipop kale, thanks to it’s candy-like appearance with its long stem and blooming floral top. Check out Brooklyn’s Chez Moi, which serves a side of lollipop kale ($6).

Microgreens

When it comes to green veggies, many kids
Photo Credit: FLICKR/ Plant Chicago

When it comes to green veggies, many kids (and adults) would agree that bigger is not in fact better. Well, microgreens are here to convince even the most salad-adverse that green veggies can be tasty, if only in small sizes. From stem to leaf, microgreens are less than 3 inches in size. These small veggies concentrate a high level of flavor and can be grown at home or in restaurant kitchens, typically used for garnish or in salads. Vitamins E, C, A and K have all been proven to be potent in microgreens, so even a few small greens can go a long way. Urban rooftop farm Brooklyn Grange farms microgreens year-round to sell to local restaurants!

Kelp

Kelp is kale’s aquatic doppelganger (in name). This
Photo Credit: FLICKR/ Kat Stan

Kelp is kale’s aquatic doppelganger (in name). This edible algae is in fact a giant seaweed and has been used as an organic thickener (alginate) in foods like ice cream, jelly and toothpaste for decades. Kelp is now seeing its time in the spotlight, as it boasts high levels of magnesium, iron, iodine and calcium and serves as a tasty green vegetable in various Asian dishes. Try the Salmon Kelp Roll ($8) at Soto, Kelp Salad ($9) at Nobu, pickled kelp ($8) at Kajitsu, the kelp noodle pad thai ($12) at Greenpoint Fish & Lobster Co and look out for kelp’s rising popularity on many more NYC menus.

Beet Greens

Beets saw a huge resurgence this year, almost
Photo Credit: FLICKR/ InAweofGod’sCreation

Beets saw a huge resurgence this year, almost rivaling kale’s popularity in salads, juices and sandwiches! But beet greens are now seeing their time in the spotlight too, with chefs and home cooks realizing the tasty tops of these tubers need not go to waste. Visit Brooklyn’s Krupa Grocery for sautéed beet greens with pickled garlic ($5), try a side of microbeets in their greens ($9) at Craftbar or make a dinner reservation at Colonie where the chef is known to toss in fresh beet and carrot tops to salads and veggie dishes.

Kohlrabi

This bulbous and fresh-tasting veggie can be enjoyed
Photo Credit: FLICKR/ di.wineanddine

This bulbous and fresh-tasting veggie can be enjoyed in so many ways. It’s delicious raw, tossed in salads. It can be sauteed with other veggies, lending whatever you’re making a buttery snappiness. It can be baked with other veggies. Kohlrabi is not an acquired taste either - it’s a gateway drug to other vegetables that may be less pleasing, like turnips.

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