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DNC speech highlights: Barack Obama, Michael Bloomberg, more

The Democratic National Convention kicked off on Monday with a diverse lineup of politicians and celebrities who spoke on behalf of Hillary Clinton.

Bill Clinton, Lena Dunham and America Ferrera were among the speakers on the second night of the convention in Philadelphia.

Scroll down to see highlights from their speeches.

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president in a speech on the final night of the DNC.

She told the audience that "America is once again at a moment of reckoning."

"Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart. Bonds of respect are fraying. ... There are no guarantees. It truly is up to us. We have to decide if we will all work together so we can all rise together," she said.

Chelsea Clinton

Chelsea Clinton called Hillary her
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Robyn Beck

Chelsea Clinton called Hillary her "wonderful, thoughtful, hilarious mother" in her DNC speech.

"I am so grateful to be her daughter ... that she is Charlotte and Aiden's grandmother. She makes me proud every single day, And Mom, Grandma would be so proud of you tonight."

Andrew Cuomo

Photo Credit: Getty Images / Chip Somodevilla

"At stake in this election, my friends, is the very soul of America," New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said in his DNC speech.

Cuomo said that the Trump campaign's "plan is to fan the flames of fear and offer a scapegoat."

"Their campaign comes down to this: Be afraid of people who are different. ... It's not right, it's divisive and it's delusional, and we must expose the truth to the people of this nation."

Barack Obama

President Barack Obama headlined Wednesday night's speeches with
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / SAUL LOEB

President Barack Obama headlined Wednesday night's speeches with what he is known for best: optimism for America. He listed off accomplishments during his tenure -- and noted how much he had aged since he first spoke at the DNC as a senator in 2004. But mostly, he focused his star power, oratory finesse and positivity toward Hillary Clinton. "There has never been a man or woman, not me, not Bill (Clinton) -- nobody more qualified than Hillary Clinton to serve as president of the United States," Obama said to cheers.

Tim Kaine

In his speech accepting the vice presidential nomination,
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

In his speech accepting the vice presidential nomination, Tim Kaine attacked Donald Trump, who he called a "one-man wrecking crew" for making empty promises. "He never tells you how he's going to do any of the things he says he's going to do. He just says, 'believe me,' Kaine said, impersonating Trump (to laughter). "So here's the question. Do you really believe him?"

Kaine said Hillary Clinton is the opposite, and voters can simply go to her website to see her plans for the nation. The nominee also spoke in Spanish, saying he and Clinton are "companeros de alma," or soul mates.

Michael Bloomberg

The former New York City mayor delivered perhaps
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Aaron P. Bernstein

The former New York City mayor delivered perhaps one of the standout lines of the DNC during his July 27, 2016, speech in calling Donald Trump a "dangerous demagogue."

Bloomberg offered up his own personal bona fides as an entrepreneur and politician as he skewered the Republican candidate for bankruptcies and getting a jump start from his father.

"Trump says he wants to run the nation like he's run his businesses? God help us," Bloomberg said.

Joe Biden

Vice President Joe Biden slammed Donald Trump in
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Justin Sullivan

Vice President Joe Biden slammed Donald Trump in his July 27, 2016, speech. "He has no clue about what makes America great. Actually he has no clue period," he said. He criticized Trump for finding pleasure in saying the phrase "You're fired."

"He's trying to tell us he cares about the middle class," Biden said. "That's a bunch of malarkey."

The vice president asked the crowd to quiet down at one point. "This is a complicated and uncertain world we live in," he said. "The threats are too great, the times are too uncertain, to elect Donald Trump as president of the United States."

Referring to Hillary Clinton, Biden said, "there's only one person in this race who will be there for you, who has always been there for you."

Gabrielle Giffords, Mark Kelly

Perhaps the most powerful words of Gabrielle Giffords'
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

Perhaps the most powerful words of Gabrielle Giffords' speech were the final ones. The former congresswoman whose political career was cut short after a gunman shot her in the head in Tucson, Arizona, in early 2011, still has difficulty speaking, and she nodded to that as she closed a short speech on gun control.

"Speaking is difficult for me. But come January, I want to say these two words: 'Madam President.' "

Giffords took the podium after being introduced by her husband, retired NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, who said that Hillary Clinton "is ready to take on one of our country's greatest moral failures here on our soil: The gun violence that is tearing so many of our communities apart."

Giffords gave a nod to girl power before casting her public vote for Hillary Clinton.

"In Congress, I learned a powerful lesson: Strong women get things done! Hillary is tough. Hillary is courageous. She will fight to make our families safer. In the White House, she will stand up to the gun lobby. That's why I'm voting for Hillary!"

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton said in a DNC speech that
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Saul Loeb

Bill Clinton said in a DNC speech that Hillary is "the best darn change-maker I've ever met in my entire life."

"If you were sitting where I am sitting and you have heard what I have heard at every dinner conversation, every lunch conversation, every long walk, you would say this woman has never been satisfied with the status quo in anything. She always wants to move the ball forward, that is just who she is," he said.

Madeleine Albright

During her speech at the convention Tuesday night,
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Robyn Beck

During her speech at the convention Tuesday night, former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright used her "more than 25 years" of friendship with Hillary Clinton to highlight how she knew that the candidate should be the next president of the United States.

"Because in this era, with these threats, we need a leader who has the experience and judgment to keep America strong, secure, and safe," she said.

Albright said she knew Clinton would be the next president because she had seen her fight for the country and "for causes that count."

Joe Crowley

Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.) gave a moving speech
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.) gave a moving speech about Hillary Clinton's response to the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

Crowley's cousin, Battalion Chief John Moran, was among the firefighters who perished on Sept. 11.

"The weight of his loss felt heavy. But there beside me that day was Hillary Clinton," Crowley said. "Hillary Clinton, the New York senator, Hillary Clinton, my friend. She understood the pain my family, our city, our nation were under. She fought to help our city rebuild. And she delivered."

Crowley said that Clinton helped secure $20 billion for New York following the terror attacks, and he noted that she worked for a decade to see the 9/11 Health and Compensation Act get passed. But Crowley said that Trump used 9/11 as "another chance to make a quick buck," collecting $15,000 in federal funds intended to help small businesses recover after the attacks, although his businesses weren't impacted.

Lena Dunham and America Ferrera

Actresses Lena Dunham and America Ferrera slammed
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

Actresses Lena Dunham and America Ferrera slammed Donald Trump in a joint speech Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention.

"We know what you're all thinking: Why should you care what some television celebrity has to say about politics?" Dunham asked. Ferrera added, "And we feel the same way - but he is the Republican nominee so we need to talk about him."

Eric Holder

Former Attorney General Eric Holder said in a
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Aaron P. Bernstein

Former Attorney General Eric Holder said in a speech at the DNC that Hillary Clinton "will help our nation summon the courage to confront racial injustice."

"At a time when our justice system is out of balance, when one in three black men will be incarcerated in their lifetimes, and when black defendants in the federal system receive sentences 20 percent longer than their white peers, we need a president who will end this policy of over-incarceration," he said.

Holder remarked that Clinton fought against racial profiling as a U.S. senator from New York, and he noted that her first speech as presidential candidate focused on criminal justice reform.

"As a presidential candidate she has talked about systemic racism in a way that no one else has," he said. "And she will help our nation summon the courage to confront racial injustice -- and face down the legacies of our darkest past."

Elizabeth Banks

Actress Elizabeth Banks on Tuesday parodied Donald Trump's
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

Actress Elizabeth Banks on Tuesday parodied Donald Trump's dramatic Republican National Convention entrance during her appearance at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Her fog-machine entrance, complete with "We Are the Champions" playing in the background, mirrored Trump's appearance on the first night of the RNC when he introduced his wife, Melania.

"You know I don't usually say this about Donald Trump, that was over the top. I confirmed it just now," Banks said, joking that she bought the Trump campaign's fog machine on eBay for $30.

Chuck Schumer

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-New York), who worked with
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-New York), who worked with Hillary Clinton in the U.S. Senate for eight years, gave a ringing endorsement of the Democratic nominee for president.

"I'm from Brooklyn. It's in our blood to sniff out bull. Now, there's a lot of that in politics, but not in Hillary," Schumer said. "When she tells you something, take it to the bank."

Bernie Sanders

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said in his speech
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said in his speech on July 25, 2016, that "Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States."

He admitted that "no one is more disappointed" than him about losing the Democratic primary, but he told the crowd that the revolution will continue.

Michelle Obama

Michelle Obama said in her speech on July
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Jessica Kourkounis

Michelle Obama said in her speech on July 25, 2016, that the 2016 race "is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives."

"I wake up every morning in a house that was built by slaves, and I watch my daughters -- two beautiful, intelligent, black young women -- playing with their dogs on the White House lawn," the first lady said in a stirring prime-time speech. "And because of Hillary Clinton, my daughters -- and all our sons and daughters -- now take for granted that a woman can be president of the United States."

Sarah Silverman

Sarah Silverman, who campaigned for Sen. Bernie Sanders,
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Joe Raedle

Sarah Silverman, who campaigned for Sen. Bernie Sanders, made clear in her speech on July 25, 2016, that she will support the Democratic nominee, even though it is not Sanders. "I am proud to be a part of Bernie's movement, and a vital part of that movement is making absolutely sure Hillary Clinton is our next president of the United States," she said.

"To the 'Bernie or Bust' people, you're being ridiculous," she added. But that didn't stop some in the crowd from chanting "Bernie" after her speech.

Silverman said Clinton is "the only person ever to be overqualified for a job as president," and joked that a few years ago, she was just a secretary. She praised Clinton for listening to Sanders' supporters and bringing their "passions into the party's platform."

Cory Booker

When New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker hears Republican
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Robyn Beck

When New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker hears Republican nominee Donald Trump make hurtful remarks about other Americans, he said he thinks of the poem "Still I Rise" by Maya Angelou.

" 'You may write me down in history / With your bitter, twisted lies / You may trod me in the very dirt / But still, like dust, I rise,' " he recited.

Calling for unity during his speech on the first night of the convention on July 25, 2016, Booker said America is a place where "love always trumps hate."

Elizabeth Warren

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren unleashed another diatribe on
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Jessica Kourkounis

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren unleashed another diatribe on Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump during her speech on July 25, 2016.

"We are here tonight because America faces a choice, the choice of a new president. On one side is a man who inherited a fortune from his father, and kept it going by cheating people, by skipping out on debts, a man who cares only for himself," Warren said. "On the other side is one of the smartest, toughest, most tenacious people on this planet."

Kirsten Gillibrand

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand told the crowd
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Jessica Kourkounis

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand told the crowd at the Wells Fargo Center on July 25, 2016, that Clinton will "always put families first" as president. She spoke of Clinton's past efforts to fight for children and families, including when she helped pass the Children's Health Insurance Program as first lady.

Gillibrand said Clinton strives to help the people who need it the most, while Donald Trump just wants to help himself.

"If you believe in keeping America great, then vote for Hillary Clinton," Gillibrand said, playing off of Trump's campaign slogan, "Make America great again."

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