We hate to disappoint you, but In-N-Out isn’t bringing its burgers to New York City this month.

A spokeswoman for the cult-favorite West Coast fast-food chain told amNewYork the California-based, family-run business has nothing to do with a now-deleted Facebook event that promises to hand out free In-N-Out burgers and branded hats and T-shirts at a SoHo pop-up later this month.

The “In-N-Out NYC October Popup” event, organized by a group called NYC Popups, has attracted the interest of more than 32,000 Facebook users. (In-N-Out said it won its dedicated following with additive-free and fresh ingredients.)

A tentative schedule on the event page sketches out three days of performances, art exhibitions, live music and food as taking place Oct. 27-29 at 92 Crosby St.

Excited New Yorkers began investigating the authenticity of the pop-up for themselves by contacting the company’s Facebook page. Customer representatives responded with assurances that no such event was scheduled and apologized for any confusion. 

In-N-Out vice president of operations Denny Warnick echoed their replies in a statement emailed to amNewYork Monday afternoon: "Unfortunately, the information in the Facebook posting ... is simply not true," he said. "We hope that no one is inconvenienced by this apparent prank."

The chain has set up pop-ups abroad — in locations such as Singapore, Tokyo, Sydney, Shanghai and London — so a residency in New York City isn’t completely far-fetched.

Disappointed New Yorkers have taken to bashing the Facebook event as “fake news.”

“Slanderous lies you soulless monster!” one Facebook user wrote.

“Is this some terrible prank meant to agonize California ex pats???” another commented.

NYC Popups's only comment on the hoax was a Facebook post featuring a collage of headlines about the fake pop-up and the statement "at least it was fun to dream."

This is not the first time New York City has mistakenly anticipated an In-N-Out touchdown. On April Fools’ Day in 2010, pranksters dressed as company employees handed out flyers advertising the arrival of a new store near Union Square in an elaborate hoax.

Fast Company first reported the falsity of the October pop-up.