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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2017 inductees: Meet the musicians

This year’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony comes with numerous story lines: Tupac Shakur becoming the first solo hip-hop artist in the Hall, potential reunions of Journey and Yes with the singers who appeared on their biggest hits, and disco pioneer Nile Rodgers unsure how to feel about the honor he is being given.

Here’s a look at 2017’s inductees, with the songs and controversies that defined them.

The performers will be honored at a celebration at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on April 7, which will be televised on HBO and on SiriusXM on April 29 at 8 p.m.

Tupac Shakur

Best known for: Being one of the most
Photo Credit: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Best known for: Being one of the most influential rappers of all time, epitomizing '90s gangsta rap in both his music and lifestyle while also incorporating introspection, sensitivity, social consciousness and poetry. He also showed some serious acting chops in movies like "Juice" and "Poetic Justice."

Most beloved song: "California Love" is his biggest hit and brought him to new levels of fame, but "Dear Mama," his tribute to his mother, who overcame drug abuse and prison, is often considered his finest moment.

Biggest controversy: During the most successful part of Shakur's career, he seemed to be constantly followed by controversy. He was arrested for fights, shot outside a Manhattan recording studio and convicted of sexual assault. Of course, his death in a 1996 drive-by shooting remains both controversial and unsolved.

Pearl Jam

Best known for: Being the biggest and longest
Photo Credit: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Best known for: Being the biggest and longest running band of the grunge era, and for doing things their own way, from refusing to release singles and videos to battling Ticketmaster over ticket prices.

Most beloved song: With a rabid audience and a massive catalog, it's almost impossible to pick one song that would top most fans' lists, but two tracks from the band's debut album "Ten" tend to consistently rank high: "Alive" and "Black."

Biggest controversy: In 1994, Pearl Jam took on Ticketmaster over what the band viewed as excessive fees, even going as far as to testify before Congress. The situation made it difficult for Pearl Jam to tour, and while no formal case was ever brought against Ticketmaster, the band did win a reputation as standing up for its fans.

Joan Baez

Best known for: Being the leader of the
Photo Credit: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Best known for: Being the leader of the 1960s folk scene, a lifelong activist for causes including civil rights and social justice, and for introducing the world to Bob Dylan by bringing him onstage for duets and to perform his own material.

Most beloved song: Known as a great interpreter, her cover of The Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," is her biggest hit, but fans would probably choose her own "Sweet Sir Galahad" or "Diamonds and Rust," which is about her relationship with Dylan.

Biggest controversy: In the 1960s, Baez's activism led to her refusing to pay taxes for a time and to two arrests during Vietnam War protests.

Electric Light Orchestra

Best known for: Being one of the first
Photo Credit: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Best known for: Being one of the first rock groups to tour with an orchestra, albeit a relatively small one with three cellos and a violin.

Most beloved song: "Mr. Blue Sky," which only hit No. 35 on the Billboard Hot 100 when it was released, but got a boost in the 2000s from appearances in TV shows and movies like "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" and "CSI."

Biggest controversy: The band almost didn't make it past 1972 when co-founder Roy Wood left the group, taking two other members with him. With Wood gone, Jeff Lynne became the primary singer and songwriter, leading ELO to its greatest success.

Journey

Best known for: Getting two generations of fans
Photo Credit: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Best known for: Getting two generations of fans to go absolutely nuts for "Don't Stop Believin'" The song hit No. 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1981, then became even more popular when it played during the final scene of "The Sopranos" in 2007. After that, it went on to become a sports anthem, most notably for the San Francisco Giants' 2010 and 2014 World Series championships, with lead singer Steve Perry frequently leading the crowd in a singalong.

Most beloved song: What else but "Don't Stop Believin'?"

Biggest controversy: After breaking up in 1987, Journey reunited in 1995 and released a new album a year later. The band was planning to tour, but couldn't go on the road because Perry needed hip replacement surgery, which he was putting off. In 1998, the band decided to tour with a new lead singer and hasn't performed with Perry since.

Yes

Best known for: Being one of the first
Photo Credit: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Best known for: Being one of the first and most successful progressive rock bands, combining lengthy, complex songs and sci-fi influenced lyrics with Simon & Garfunkel-style harmonies and pop melodies.

Most beloved song: "Roundabout," which brings together many of the band's best qualities and was the biggest hit of its 1970s heyday.

Biggest controversy: While Yes has dealt with membership changes since its earliest days, the most controversial came in 2008. That's when lead singer Jon Anderson was replaced by Benoit David, who had previously played in a Yes cover band, after Anderson suffered respiratory issues that left him unable to tour. Anderson has expressed interest in coming back, but it hasn't happened yet, although he has toured with other former Yes members.

Nile Rodgers

Best known for: The unique, dance-able rhythm guitar
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Gareth Cattermole

Best known for: The unique, dance-able rhythm guitar lines he contributed to Chic; producing tons of albums including David Bowie's "Let's Dance" and Madonna's "Like A Virgin;" and being sampled on major hip-hop singles from The Sugarhill Gang's "Rapper's Delight" to Notorious B.I.G.'s "Mo Money Mo Problems." More recently, he co-wrote and played on Daft Punk's "Get Lucky."

Most beloved song: For the old school fans, it's Chic's "Good Times," but there are probably plenty of others who were introduced to him as the guy on "Get Lucky."

Biggest controversy: After being on the ballot 11 times, Chic has still not been inducted into the Hall of Fame, so Rodgers has mixed feelings about being given the "Award for Musical Excellence," which is different from being inducted as a performer. He told Rolling Stone, "Even though I'm quite flattered that they believed that I was worthy, my band Chic didn't win. They plucked me out of the band and said, 'You're better than Chic.' That's wacky to me."

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