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American Museum of Natural History debuts Titanosaur, largest known dinosaur

It was an unveiling of epic proportions.

After an 18-month excavation, millions of years of fossilization and a spirited New Year's-esque countdown from 10, the American Museum of Natural History pulled back the velvet curtain and debuted their newest exhibit: The Titanosaur.

This 122-foot-long dinosaur — so new that the scientists who discovered it in Argentina in 2014 didn't even have a name for it — peeks out of the gallery and welcomes visitors in to another signature piece of AMNH.

Like standing under the great blue whale (which at 94 feet is actually 30 feet shorter than the Titanosaur), walking past this enormous Titanosaur is awe-inducing.

Ellen V. Futter, president of AMNH, remarked that she wanted the Titanosaur to offer a "hospitable welcome" to museum guests.

A natural herbivore, the nonpredatory Titanosaur is indeed a remarkable inclusion in the AMNH paleontology collection.

The Titanosaur opens to the public on Friday. Here's what you need to know about the magnificent dino.

The Titanosaur uses gender-neutral pronouns

Scientists don't know if this Titanosaur is male
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Scientists don't know if this Titanosaur is male or female.

The Titanosaur weighed 70 tons

That's about as much as 10 African elephants.
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

That's about as much as 10 African elephants.

The Titanosaur is a young adult

Beware, this teenage Titanosaur may get angsty. Scientists
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Beware, this teenage Titanosaur may get angsty. Scientists can tell that this animal is not a full-grown adult because of how its vertebrae are spaced. "When the animal is done growing, the vertebrae are fused," explained paleontologist Diego Pol, who led the excavation in Argentina.

The Titanosaur is 46 feet tall

Stack seven professional basketball players on top of
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Stack seven professional basketball players on top of each other, and they may be able to reach the top of the Titanosaur.

The Titanosuar's neck is 39 feet long

From snout to tail, the entire Titanosaur is
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

From snout to tail, the entire Titanosaur is 122 feet long.

The skeleton on display doesn't actually include real fossils

The fossils would be way too heavy to
Photo Credit: AMNH

The fossils would be way too heavy to display on such a large scale. Instead, the bones are made from fiberglass 3D prints that are based on casts of 84 bones discovered in Argentina. Missing bones were also created based on an analysis of the Titanosaur's relatives.

The fossils on display weigh between 140 and 1,100 pounds

Fossils are stone, not bone, so the Titanosaur
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Fossils are stone, not bone, so the Titanosaur wouldn't have been carrying around all that actual weight, but it was still estimated at 70 tons when alive.

#Titanosaur debuts to the public on Friday, Jan. 15

Yes, this dinosaur has a hashtag.
Photo Credit: American Museum of Natural History

Yes, this dinosaur has a hashtag.

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