Alcohol ads are banned from city property, including bus shelters and LinkNYC kiosks

Mayor Bill de Blasio's executive order banning alcohol advertisements on city property applies to phone booths, Wi-Fi LinkNYC kiosks and recycling kiosks. Photo Credit: Colter Hettich

Mayor Bill de Blasio cited a study that exposure to alcohol advertisements can increase the likelihood of alcohol consumption.

Mayor Bill de Blasio's executive order banning alcohol advertisements on city property applies to phone booths, Wi-Fi LinkNYC kiosks and recycling kiosks.
Mayor Bill de Blasio’s executive order banning alcohol advertisements on city property applies to phone booths, Wi-Fi LinkNYC kiosks and recycling kiosks. Photo Credit: Graphic by Matthew Cassella

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Tuesday said all alcohol advertising on city property will be banned — effective immediately — including places like newsstands and bus shelters. 

De Blasio announced the executive order, which includes all future advertising contracts or contract renewals, citing a study that exposure to alcohol advertisements can increase the likelihood of alcohol consumption.

“There’s no doubt that far too many New Yorkers struggle with serious substance misuse issues, among them excessive drinking,” de Blasio said in a statement. “This order banning alcohol ads from City property reaffirms our commitment to health equity and our stand to protect the well-being of all New Yorkers.”

The executive order also applies to phone booths, Wi-Fi LinkNYC kiosks and recycling kiosks. According to the mayor’s office, venues like restaurants, stadiums and concert halls that already sell alcohol are exempt.

According to the mayor’s office, there were 110,000 alcohol-related emergency room visits in the city in 2016, and 2,000 New Yorkers died from alcohol-related causes, including liver disease and driving accidents.

“In New York City, we see far too many deaths related to alcohol,” Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot said in a statement. “We know exposure to alcohol advertising can lead to drinking more alcohol, more often — behavior that can be harmful and even fatal. Today’s ban of alcohol ads on City property will help protect communities from the burden of harmful alcohol advertising.”

Alison Fox