The top dog of the 139th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show stands at just 15 inches, but Miss P the beagle won the hearts of best in show judge David Merriam and plenty in the crowd, who let out cheers of surprise when the diminutive canine was announced the winner. The adorable Canadian hound strutted around Madison Square Garden like a true pro. Here are nine reasons why she stole our hearts.

Miss P is the 1st female beagle to win Westminster

A 15-inch beagle (13-inch beagles are also part
A 15-inch beagle (13-inch beagles are also part of the American Kennel Club), Miss P is only the second beagle to win Westminster in its 139-year history. She is the only female beagle to win best in show. (Credit: Getty Images / Timothy A. Clary)

Uno is her grand-uncle

Miss P is the grandniece of Uno, the
Miss P is the grandniece of Uno, the first beagle to win Westminster. Uno (pictured) took the best in show title at the 132nd Westminster at Madison Square Garden on Feb. 12, 2008. He retired to Austin, Texas. (Credit: Getty Images / Timothy A. Clary)

Miss P won against some stiff competition

The crowd favorite, by far, was Old English
The crowd favorite, by far, was Old English sheepdog Swagger, who won best in show reserve at Westminster in 2013. He was back in full fluff, along with a Portuguese water dog, Matisse, who has a famous cousin in Sunny Obama and is, according to The Associated Press, the most winning male with 238 wins under his hypoallergenic belt. But 4-year-old Miss P rose above the stiff competition of six other stellar canines to impress judge David Merriam (pictured, looking toward second-place winner Charlie the Skye terrier as he walks past Swagger), who deliberated for 20 minutes. (Credit: Getty Images / Andrew Burton)

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Miss P makes people smile

From those who saw her in the ring
From those who saw her in the ring -- including her over-the-moon handler William Alexander (pictured after his hound was named best in show win on Feb. 17, 2015) -- at Westminster to the many folks she visited on her NYC tour (including designer Michael Kors, at Sardi's), Miss P makes people smile. (Credit: Craig Ruttle)

Miss P's official name is Tashtins Lookin for Trouble

MIss P -- short for Peyton -- has
MIss P -- short for Peyton -- has an official name of Tashtins Lookin for Trouble. Any beagle lover knows that the scent hound is all about following that powerful nose and that can, indeed, lead to mischief. (Credit: Getty Images / Andrew Burton)

She proved that not all beagles bring on the noise

Miss P showed the world that not all
Miss P showed the world that not all beagles make lots of noise. Though the breed is known for its bay -- which her granduncle Uno famously brought to Westminster -- P kept her howls for well after she took the top prize. A gracious winner, that Miss P. (Credit: Getty Images / Andrew Burton)

Miss P loves New York

During a whirlwind tour of NYC, which saw
During a whirlwind tour of NYC, which saw her visiting the "Today" show, the Empire State Building and plenty of newsrooms, Miss P took a bite out of the Big Apple the day after her win. If the steak she chomped at Sardi's (pictured, being fed by the famous restaurant's president V. Max Klimavicius, on Feb. 18, 2015), we'd say she loves New York. And she's welcome back, any time. (Credit: Getty Images / Timothy A. Clary)

Miss P is a pro

MIss P is a pro: The 4-year-old beagle
MIss P is a pro: The 4-year-old beagle came to Westminster with 19 U.S. best in shows in paw. And now, she's North American royalty, loving her purple ribbons. (Credit: Getty Images / Andrew Burton)

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Miss P is perfection

At the news conference following the final Westminster
At the news conference following the final Westminster show, handler William Alexander noted that, "She’s hungry and I’m overwhelmed." And he also hinted at the perfection of the 15-inch beagle, who will now retire to motherhood in Canada, when he talked about what she had done well: “She just never let me down. She didn’t make any mistakes.” (Credit: Getty Images / Timothy A. Clary)