NYC nurses won’t strike, having reached a deal with hospital systems

Members of the New York State Nurses Association protest outside Mount Sinai Hospital on the Upper East Side last month. Photo Credit: Courtesy of the NYSNA

The tentative contract extension with Mount Sinai, Montefiore and New York Presbyterian hospitals will include new hires, wage hikes.

Members of the New York State Nurses Association protest outside Mount Sinai Hospital on the Upper East Side last month.
Members of the New York State Nurses Association protest outside Mount Sinai Hospital on the Upper East Side last month. Photo Credit: Colter Hettich

The New York State Nurses Association announced Tuesday that it has reached a tentative deal with three major hospital systems to avoid a strike by nearly 10,000 of its members.

The union said  the tentative contract extension with Mount Sinai, Montefiore and New York Presbyterian hospitals includes the hiring of 1,450 nurses. The initial hires would fill vacancies, while an additional $100 million would help fill  newly added full-time positions, according to a news release by the union. The contract agreement also includes a wage increase of 3 percent, and full retro-pay.

“Registered nurse staffing will be based on safe staffing ratios that will be included in the collective bargaining agreements and enforced by an independent neutral party,” the Nurses Association said in a statement.

The tentative contract, which will be voted on by the union’s members,  would expire on Dec. 31, 2022. Members have been working without a contract since October. The union said its members’ workloads have grown tremendously — in some cases, one nurse would be responsible for 18 patients.

Marc Kramer, lead negotiator for the NYC Hospital Alliance and president of the League of Voluntary Hospitals and Homes, said the agreement would allow for the best care for patients. 

"This significant investment in our nursing teams will ultimately benefit patients in the long term, while preserving hospitals’ flexibility to deliver the individual, tailored health care that our institutions are known for around the world," he said in a statement. 

The Nurses Association threatened last month to strike, and had the support of several elected officials, including City Council Speaker Corey Johnson. They postponed the strike two weeks ago as negotiations resumed. 

Ivan Pereira