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Celebrity chefs recreated the Titanic's final first class meal

Iceberg lettuce wasn't even on the menu.

But a luxurious 10 courses made up the Titanic's last first-class dinner, served on April 14, 1912, just hours before the 11:40 p.m. collision with an iceberg.

To celebrate the debut of Liberty Science Center's Titanic artifacts exhibition opening Oct. 31, celebrity chefs Alex Guarnaschelli and Donatella Arpaia recreated every dish off a menu served on the Titanic's very last night afloat.

While some recipes went down with the ship, the two chefs recreated a meal designed for a time when decadence was more important than waistlines and dining sans Instagram was the main event.

A first-class ticket on the Titanic cost the equivalent of about $60,000 today, but you can jump on ship for free to revisit the last meal on board. A $23,000 unsinkable cracker not included.

Oysters mignonette

Oysters on the half shell with classic mignonette
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Oysters on the half shell with classic mignonette sauce and served on a bed of sea salt started the meal. Of course, there was champagne to accompany the first course, and every course thereafter.

Soup duo

With such an exorbitant ticket price, you can't
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

With such an exorbitant ticket price, you can't expect just one soup. Consomme Olga -- a soup made from beef, veal and port -- was served with sliced scallops and English cucumber and a much heartier cream of barley rounded out the double soup course.

Cold asparagus vinaigrette

White and green asparagus tips were served with
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

White and green asparagus tips were served with edible flowers and greens that chef Guarnaschelli foraged at the green market before the meal. She likened herself to one of the ship's chefs, picking out only the best ingredients to serve on board the elite ocean liner.

Filet mignon lili, saute of Chicken Lyonnaise and vegetable marrow farci

Is there anything more decadent than multiple animal
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Is there anything more decadent than multiple animal proteins in a single course? Seared filet topped with truffles on a bed of crispy potatoes in a Cognac, Madeira and red wine sauce was the highlight of the fourth course, though marrow-stuffed zucchini was certainly tasty Titanic fare.

Choice of lamb with mint sauce, roast duck with apple sauce or sirloin of beef with red wine demi

You could call the fifth course the main,
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

You could call the fifth course the main, but really, there's a lot more to come. The fluffy green pea timbale served on the side of every dish resonated well with the 21st century diners. Creamed carrots and rice pilaf were also included in this course.

Punch Romaine

Formally known as a palate cleanser, this sixth
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Formally known as a palate cleanser, this sixth course was also intended to get dinner guests drunk and ready for the four more courses ahead! Lemon-orange sorbet was topped with champagne and white wine syrup, though rum and vodka could also be tossed into the sweet mix.

Roasted squab with cress sauce

Refrigeration was key to some of the must
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Refrigeration was key to some of the must indulgent items served aboard the Titanic. Quail was sourced all the way from Egypt and other delicacies from abroad were taken to the ship's dock in Southampton to stock up for the voyage, where food cost was no consideration for the first class menus.

Poached salmon with mousseline sauce and cucumbers

This was basically the sashimi course of the
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

This was basically the sashimi course of the meal. A classic mousseline sauce, similar to a hollandaise (think brunch), is made with egg yolks, butter, lemon juice and whipped cream but chef Arpaia played up her Italian heritage with mascarpone in the sauce.

Pate de foie gras

Obviously the ninth course had to be foie
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Obviously the ninth course had to be foie gras. Served with a celery root garnish, pomegranate seeds and tiny toasts, this was a rich (almost) finish to the 10-course meal.

Waldorf pudding

This dessert, similar to a Waldorf salad with
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

This dessert, similar to a Waldorf salad with ingredients like raisins and apples, was one of the recipes that forever disappeared with the Titanic. Served with French vanilla ice cream, a selection of eclairs and coffee, the heart of the meal went on well into the night.

And don't worry, second class didn't have it too shabby...

Second class on the Titanic was equivalent to
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Second class on the Titanic was equivalent to most first-class cabins at the time. The menus were similar to first class, with a few substitutions. Even third-class passengers ate well, better than at home for many, where fresh produce and protein may have been scarce.

While the dinner was a a once-in-a-lifetime event, you can still visit Titanic food artifacts!

Pictured are unused casserole dishes that went down
Photo Credit: Melissa Kravitz

Pictured are unused casserole dishes that went down with the ship in a wooden cabinet that later disintegrated and left the dinnerware in near pristine condition.

"Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition" is open from Oct. 31, 2015 – May 30, 2016 at Liberty Science Center, in Jersey City. And yes, the Jack and Rose photo op is worth taking the PATH train for.

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