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Marty Golden concedes to Andrew Gounardes in Brooklyn senate race

Gounardes was leading by more than 1,000 votes, according to the unofficial New York Board of Elections results.

Marty Golden, left, conceded to Andrew Gounardes on

Marty Golden, left, conceded to Andrew Gounardes on Monday. Photo Credit: Composite: Golden campaign, left, and Nicole Brown

Longtime Republican State Sen. Marty Golden conceded his loss to Democratic challenger Andrew Gounardes on Monday, as the Board of Elections completes its final count of ballots. 

"I congratulate Andrew Gounardes and wish him well in his service to the people of the 22nd state Senate district," Golden said in a statement.

Gounardes declared victory the day after the close race on Nov. 6, but Golden's campaign had said it was "assessing the ballot situation — machine and absentee — to ensure that every vote is counted."

According to the unofficial New York Board of Elections results, Gounardes was leading by more than 1,100 votes. There were about 1,400 absentee ballots that were being counted after Election Day, Gounardes said.

The BOE has not released certified results, as of Monday.

Golden has represented the south Brooklyn district, which covers neighborhoods from Bay Ridge to Marine Park, since 2003.

"Although we came up just short this election, I am grateful my career in public service has been full of much success as a police officer and as an elected official," Golden said. "As I think of the future, my supporters, neighbors and friends can be sure that I will still always look for opportunities to make our neighborhoods an even better place to live, work and raise a family."

Gounardes, who lost to Golden in 2012, went door-to-door during his campaign and focused on issues like pedestrian safety, funding the MTA and reforming campaign finance. 

With the new Democratic majority in the state Senate, Gounardes said he is looking forward to "finally start passing the bills that have been languishing in Albany for years.

"Whether that’s the Reproductive Health Act, the Child Victims Act, the New York Health Act, or even something much more local like speed cameras in every school zone in the city of New York," he said.

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