Everyone has a story that involves LaGuardia Airport--and now a coyote does as well. A coyote was spotted near Queens' second-best airport on Thursday, and this latest spotting came one week after one was captured in Middle Village. Of course, these are hardly the first coyotes has been spotted in the concrete jungle. See other times coyotes came to the big city.

Near LaGuardia Airport, May 2015

It's a new month, so of course there

It's a new month, so of course there are more coyote sightings. A USPS worker spotted a coyote around 2 a.m. on Thursday, May 7 near LaGuardia Airport at Ditmars Blvd. and 82nd St., Port Authority confirmed. Port Authority police and NYPD responded but the coyote ran toward Elmjack Field, Port Authority said.

There have not been any sightings since, Port Authority said. Of course, this coyote might have been trying to leave NYC--there have been a lot of essays about leaving NYC lately.

(Credit: Uli Seit)

Middle Village, April 2015

Coyotes, coyotes everywhere you look! A Middle Village

Coyotes, coyotes everywhere you look! A Middle Village resident spotted this coyote napping on the porch, and notified social media and the police (not necessarily in that order). Let he among us who has never taken a nap on a porch cast the first stone.

But the coyote showed better turnaround without coffee than most of us, as it alluded capture from police. The NYPD's 104th Precinct tweeted that the coyote ran off when approached, and residents should call 911 if they see it.

The NYPD's 104th Precinct announced on Wednesday that they had caught a coyote at 77th Place and Caldwell Avenue, but police would not confirm if it was the same coyote. The animal was taken to Animal Care & Control in Manhattan.

Middle Village, your streets are safe again. Except for any hipsters that might seep over from Ridgewood, that is.

(Credit: Twitter / 104th Precinct)

Battery Park City, April 2015

Is there a certain howl that has been

Is there a certain howl that has been attracting coyotes to NYC lately? The NYPD captured a coyote in Battery Park City on April 25, 2015. Police said they observed the coyote in the marina area and then cornered it in a cafe after about an hour.

While it's hard to fault any person or animal for wanting to enjoy Battery Park City on a day with weather that lovely, it's hard not to get a bit worried when it's the fourth coyote sighting in a month. We all came to the big city with big dreams, but doesn't it seem like the coyotes are over-reaching Try a smaller market first, guys.

(Credit: DCPI)

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Riverside Park, April 2015

Note to coyotes: The sun rises in the

Note to coyotes: The sun rises in the East, so if you want to see a beautiful NYC sunrise, you should hang out in an East River Park.

This coyote clearly didn't get that memo. A coyote was spotted near West 87th St. and Riverside Drive early on Wednesday, April 22. The NYPD responded, advised residents to stay away from the park and updated via Twitter the coyote's last known whereabouts. It was spotted on West 112th and then by Grant's Tomb before the NYPD said it was nestled too deeply in the brush, and they were abandoning the search.

Is this another coyote or is it one captured earlier this year from the same park, who was released into the wilderness in the Bronx?

All jokes aside, the coyote sighting comes just days after two dangerous incidents in New Jersey--and a report of a coyote den near a school in New Jersey.

(Credit: Google )

Chelsea, April 2015

Wandering Chelsea in the morning, dazed and lost
Wandering Chelsea in the morning, dazed and lost and ending up in custody of the NYPD? We've all been there, so how can we blame a coyote for doing the same thing? The NYPD captured a coyote at the Church of the Holy Apostles on West 28th St. and 9th Ave. around 8:30 a.m. The NYPD tweeted this photo of the coyote, and it is now in the custody of Animal Control. It's unclear what's next for the coyote. (Credit: Twitter / NYPDSpecialOps)

Long Island City, March 2015

Long Island City is trendy now, sure. But
Long Island City is trendy now, sure. But who know coyotes came with gentrification? A coyote was spotted wandering on the roof of LIC Bar on Vernon Boulevard on March 30th--and even managed to evade cops and escape. Keep your eye out for a hipster coyote, New Yorkers. (Credit: Flickr / osmium)

Stuy Town, January 2015

In between Friday snow and a (predicted) Monday
In between Friday snow and a (predicted) Monday blizzard, Sunday, January 26 was a blissful, sunny break. Except all was not well in Gotham: The NYPD captured a coyote in Stuyvesant Town on Sunday, according to the New York Daily News. The coyote was apparently in good health, and will be released into wilderness in the Bronx. This was the second time in January that a coyote has been captured in Manhattan in January, so that's not ominous or anything. (Credit: Getty Images / Getty Images/Mario Tama)

Upper West Side, January 2015

Riverside Drive in the 70s is great for
Riverside Drive in the 70s is great for running. Unfortunately, coyotes apparently know about it too. A coyote was spotted running on Riverside Drive between 72nd and 79th Streets around 9:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015, according to the New York Post. The NYPD eventually captured--and tranquilized--the female coyote at a basketball court at West 76th Street and Riverside Drive. The coyote was released into "an appropriate wilderness area in the Bronx" on Sunday, according to the Associated Press, which doesn't make much sense when you think about how easy it is to take the D train from the Bronx to the Upper West Side. (Credit: Google, 2014)

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Bronx Park East, 2014

Why did the coyote cross the road? To
Why did the coyote cross the road? To terrify everyone at a playground, apparently. In June 2014, a coyote was spotted crossing Bronx Park East into the park and circling Ben Abrams Playground, according to the NY Daily News. Fun for the whole family? Coyotes are actually pretty common in nearby Van Cortlandt Park, where there is a statue dedicated to a female coyote who was killed crossing the Major Deegan Expressway in 1995. (Credit: Google)

Freshkills Park, 2012

Freshkills Park is not open to the public
Freshkills Park is not open to the public yet, but coyotes are already calling the place home. A park worker spotted a coyote there on April 5, 2012 that is still roaming free, and is known to locals as the The Staten Island Coyote. (Credit: Caroline Linton)

Locust Manor, 2009-11

The LIRR is not exactly a premium destination
The LIRR is not exactly a premium destination for anybody, although the Locust Manor coyote apparently begs to differ. First spotted in 2009 in an apartment complex in Rosedale, a coyote was again spotted on the LIRR tracks near the Locust Manor station. In fact, one resident even reported seeing two coyotes in the neighborhood. Since this is the social media age, a parody Twitter account has been set up for Willie D. Coyote, who allegedly is "from Alaska, moved to Locust Manor looking for a better life ..." Aren't we all, Willie. But the coyote seems to be getting a little comfortable: As recently as 2011, posters appeared in the neighborhood warning about coyotes due to recent sightings. (Credit: Google)

Van Cortlandt Golf Course, 2006 & 2010

Coyotes are not unknown to the Bronx. But
Coyotes are not unknown to the Bronx. But one brazen coyote decided that golf was his (or her) game, and reportedly shadowed a game at the ninth hole at one point. The coyotes are known to eat golf balls and attack raccoons. After a sighting in 2006, park officials told The New York Times, the coyote on the course is named Jacob Van Cortlandt, after the man the park is named after. Just what every mayor dreams of, having a coyote named after him. (Credit: Flickr / shan213)

Chelsea Piers, 2010

Who doesn't enjoy the sports complex at Chelsea
Who doesn't enjoy the sports complex at Chelsea Piers? Apparently even coyotes love it. A coyote was spotted off West 24th Street near Chelsea Piers in March 2010, according to the New York Post. Although the coyote was cornered by police, it managed to escape and was free to roam Chelsea.

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Columbia University, 2010

Just weeks before a coyote was spotted near
Just weeks before a coyote was spotted near Chelsea Piers, there were two sightings near in Columbia University. In February 2010, the school's director of public safety at Barnard sent a letter warning students not to feed the animals if spotted. Left out was that the coyote was spotted on Sunday morning, when no college student ventures into sunlight, ever. (Credit: Google)

Trinity Cemetery, 2010

What's more terrifying than a coyote? How about
What's more terrifying than a coyote? How about a coyote hybrid? The NYPD tranquilized and captured a "coyote hybrid" (did it escape from Plum Island or something?) in the Trinity Cemetery on 155th and Broadway in January 2010, according to Gothamist. Although the parks commissioner said it was the third coyote he had seen in 10 years, Gothamist noted that one resident tweeted "they callin it a coyote but i know better, that was a harlem rat." (Credit: Google)

Central Park Hal, captured 2006

Only a tourist would think you could escape
Only a tourist would think you could escape capture in Central Park. After being spotted in Central Park in March 2006, police wasted no time in chasing--yes actually chasing--the coyote through the park. He was finally tranquilized and captured at the Fire Department dispatch station near the 79th Street transverse. Just hours earlier, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said "this is New York, and I would suggest that the coyote may have more problems than the rest of us." The coyote was named Hal after he was captured, and he was sent to live in the wild. It's unclear how he arrived, although he possibly hitched a ride on a garbage truck or paddled across the Hudson River. Just chasing the New York dream like the rest of us, Hal. (Credit: Tara Conry)

Central Park, 1999

Hal is not the first coyote to try
Hal is not the first coyote to try his dreams in Central Park. In 1999, a coyote named Otis was captured in the park and brought to the Queens Zoo. Banished to Queens. Ouch. (Credit: Flickr user guillermo varela)