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Things to Do

NYC weekend picks: Lunar New Year Parade, Joe Jackson's Town Hall and more things to do

Don't have any plans for the weekend? We're here to help.

There are plenty of reasons to get out of the apartment and experience real life.

Here are our picks for things to do in your city this weekend.

Commemorate the Stonewall Riots at NYPL

In June 1969, riots broke out around The
Photo Credit: The New York Public Library/Diana Davies

In June 1969, riots broke out around The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village -- the starting point of the modern LGBTQ civil rights movement. The New York Public Library is marking the 50th anniversary with "Love & Resistance: Stonewall 50," an exhibition offering a look at photography from the time, as well as other related media and images. In the photo: A Gay Liberation Front march on Times Square, 1969. (Free, New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, 476 Fifth Ave., nypl.org)

Solo dining at Dirt Candy (Feb. 12-16)

The ladies at Dirt Candy, chef de cuisine
Photo Credit: Evan Sung

The ladies at Dirt Candy, chef de cuisine Amanda-Lee Chesley and executive chef Amanda Cohen, want everyone to feel comfortable while dining for Valentine's Day so they're throwing their annual Solo Diner's Week. For those who want to forget about the "smug marrieds" and treat themselves, Dirt Candy is offering a whopping one-person, seven-course meal for $80, which starts with a glass of bubbly and ends with dessert. They are promising "a meal to remember." ($80, 212-228-7732, dirtcandynyc.com)

Adopt a puppy (Feb. 15)

Bideawee is holding an adoption event at a
Photo Credit: Bideawee

Bideawee is holding an adoption event at a FiDi hotel during the lunchtime hours on Friday, where you can meet adoptable puppies, asked questions and more. (Free entry, 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Q&A Hotel, 70 Pine St.)

Madison Avenue wishing tree (Feb. 9-16)

Honoring a centuries-old tradition, Madison Avenue is installing
Photo Credit: Getty Images/iStock

Honoring a centuries-old tradition, Madison Avenue is installing a Wishing Tree between East 62nd and 63rd streets, where the public is invited to place a ribbon with their wish on a branch. Those who do so will receive a traditional red envelope containing a gift certificate from one of Madison Avenue's retailers (Aaron Basha, Alexis Bittar, alice + olivia, Arlene Angard Designs & Fine Arts, Atelier Cologne, Barton Perreira, Bottega Veneta, David Webb, Etro, Frette, Grazie, Isaia, Jaded Jewels, Jennifer Tattanelli, John Paul Ataker, Kate Spade, Lalique, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Molton Brown, Montblanc, Morgenthal Frederics, Mr & Mrs Italy, NARS Cosmetics, Paul Morelli, Rebecca Taylor, Schutz, Tory Burch, Vilebrequin and Wolford.) The celebration kicks off on Feb. 9

'Long Live the King,' a Nat King Cole tribute (Feb. 15)

Jazz artist Allan Harris performs an evening of
Photo Credit: Sandrine Lee

Jazz artist Allan Harris performs an evening of Cole's most memorable songs with his trio, including "I'll Be Seeing You," "The Very Thought of You," "Mona Lisa" and "Unforgettable." Nibble on some wine and cheese as you listen to the performance with a view of the ocean. ($40-$42, 7 p.m., 2001 Oriental Blvd., Brooklyn,  onstageatkingsborough.org)

Abrons Arts Center Lunar New Year celebration (Feb. 16)

Celebrate the Year of the Pig with Abrons
Photo Credit: Jia Sung

Celebrate the Year of the Pig with Abrons Arts Center, Wing on Wo's W.O.W Project and Yellow Jackets Collective, which will host a evening of live performances, art activities, karaoke, DJ sets and food from local restaurants. (Free, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Abrons Arts Center, 466 Grand St., abronsartscenter.org)

'The Value of Sanctuary' (Feb. 14 - June 30)

A multi-disciplinary exhibition at St. John the Divine
Photo Credit: Cathedral of St. John the Divine / Jacob Hessler & Richard Blanco

A multi-disciplinary exhibition at St. John the Divine that explores the current political conversation about borders and identity, "The Value of Sanctuary: Building a House Without Walls," opens on Thursday and will remain on view through June. Modern artists like Juan Jose Barboza-Gubo and Andrew Mroczek, Alexandra Bel, Jules de Balincourt, Alicia Eggert, Nona Faustine, For Freedoms, Jenny Holzer, Juliana Huxtable, ICY and SOT, Baseera Khan, Eiko Otake, Eva Petrič, Kiki Smith and more. (Free, 6 to 9 p.m., 1047 Amsterdam Ave., Harlem,  stjohndivine.org)

'The Glass Menagerie' (FEB. 13-24)

Pingeholed Theater presents its adaptation of "The Glass
Photo Credit: Gabriel Frye-Behar

Pingeholed Theater presents its adaptation of "The Glass Menagerie," a Tennessee Williams play about a family's struggle to detach from the past and deal with familial obligation. Directed by Justin Fuller, the cast features Katie Sparer ("The Sopranos", "Awake and Sing!") as Amanda Wingfield, Justin Cimino as Tom Wingfield, Laura Piccoli as Laura Wingfield, and Padraig Carragher as Jim O'Connor. ($20, Secret Theater, 44-02 23rd St.,  artful.ly)

See the MCC production of 'The Light' (through March 17)

MCC Theater launches its new home in Hell's
Photo Credit: Joan Marcus

MCC Theater launches its new home in Hell's Kitchen with a production of Loy A. Webb's "The Light," a two-character drama about a marriage proposal that doesn't quite go as planned. Logan Vaughn directs the show, which stars Mandi Masden and McKinley Belcher III, in photo. (Starting at $54, Robert W. Wilson MCC Theater Space, 511 W. 52nd St., mcctheater.org)

See 'I Am Cuba' at Film Forum (through Feb. 21)

Mikhail Kalatozov's Russian-funded film about revolutionary Cuba, from
Photo Credit: Milestone Films/Photofest

Mikhail Kalatozov's Russian-funded film about revolutionary Cuba, from 1964, is pure propaganda but contains some of the most extraordinary camerawork you'll ever see -- swooping, swirling, physics-defying sequences that still dazzle and mystify. It was unseen in the United States until 1992; it returns in a new digital restoration. ($15, Film Forum, 209 W. Houston St., filmforum.org)

See a Yiddish 'Fiddler on the Roof'

After a lengthy (and four-time extended) run at
Photo Credit: ProperPix /Victor Nechay

After a lengthy (and four-time extended) run at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbienne production of "Fiddler on the Roof" has moved uptown. Directed by Joel Grey, the production is in Yiddish with English supertitles. In previews for a Feb. 21 opening. (From $59, Stage 42, 422 W. 42nd St., telecharge.com)

Get a little closer to flora at NYBG (Feb. 16-18)

The biophilia hypothesis proposes that people humans possess
Photo Credit: The New York Botanical Garden

The biophilia hypothesis proposes that people humans possess a deep-down need to bond with nature and living things. #Plantlove: The Weekend tackles that theory via a new exhibition in the New York Botanical Garden's Enid A. Haupt Conservatory. Doings include tours, live performances, curated viewings, a propagation demonstration and even a plant-focused happy hour. ($28, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, nybg.org)

'Exhibitionism' retrospective at the Museum at FIT (through April 20)

The Museum at FIT has pulled more than
Photo Credit: Corey Sipkin

The Museum at FIT has pulled more than 80 ensembles from 33 of its most influential exhibitions over its history (of more than 200 exhibits in total) to curate its newest showcase -- "Exhibitionism: 50 Years of the Museum at FIT." While 33 exhibits are far too many to name here, the best from the museum's "Fairy Tale Fashion," "Black Fashion Designers," "Yves Saint Laurent + Halston: "Gothic: Dark Glamour," "Japan Fashion Now," "A Queer History of Fashion: From the Closet to the Catwalk," and much more are represented. (Free, noon to 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays; and Saturdays, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Seventh Avenue at 27th Street, fitnyc.edu)

Enthusiastic Dad's Winter Formal (Fridays and Saturdays)

Greenpoint bar and lounge The Springs is throwing
Photo Credit: iStock

Greenpoint bar and lounge The Springs is throwing "Enthusiastic Dad's Winter Formal" so you can relive your awkward phase without the confusing hormones and having to catch a ride with your older friend. This party will have a photo booth with balloons, a wall covered with silver tinsel, plenty of group dancing, classic hand-painted banners and drinks you might have enjoyed when you were a young(er) adult. ($65 per person includes a four-hour open bar, 10 p.m., The Springs, 224 Franklin St., Brooklyn, hespringsbklyn.com)

Watch the Lunar New Year parade (Feb. 17)

The Lunar New Year is celebrated with large
Photo Credit: Charles Eckert

The Lunar New Year is celebrated with large public events in Brooklyn and Queens, but the largest parade is still the procession that takes place in Manhattan's Chinatown. Winding along Mott and Canal Streets, the show moves down East Broadway toward the Manhattan Bridge before swinging up between Eldridge and Forsyth streets toward Grand Street (next to Sara D. Roosevelt Park). Expect thousands of people to line the streets as performers, people in festive costumes, marching bands and, of course, lots of colorful lion and dragon dancers, which tradition holds will bring luck while frightening away evil spirits. (Free, 1 to 4:30 pm., Chinatown, betterchinatown.com)

See 'The Convent' at A.R.T./New York Theatres (through Feb. 17)

A group of women go on a retreat,
Photo Credit: Ahron R. Foster

A group of women go on a retreat, hoping to live like nuns in the Middle Ages in the world premiere of "The Convent," Jessica Dickey's dark comedy. Somehow 1980s pop, hallucinogens and sex all come into play. ($45, A.R.T./New York Theatres, 502 W. 53rd St., weathervanetheater.org)

See a retrospective of Jeff Goldblum films (Starts Feb. 8)

The Goldblum Variations, a retrospective of films with
Photo Credit: Cohen Film Collections

The Goldblum Variations, a retrospective of films with the irrepressible, idiosyncratic Jeff Goldblum, coincides with the release of a new restoration of 1977's "Between the Lines," in photo, a prescient story of journalists facing the corporate chopping block. The series includes such favorites as "Jurassic Park," "The Fly" and "The Big Chill." Other titles will be added. ($16, the Quad Cinema, 34 W. 13th St., quadcinema.com)

'Crusader: Martin Luther King Jr.' exhibit (through April 6)

Images from Martin Luther King Jr.'s visit to
Photo Credit: Schomburg Center, NYPL / Jonathan Blanc

Images from Martin Luther King Jr.'s visit to India in 1959 to see Mahatma Gandhi and intimate photos of the late civil rights leader at home with his family as well as his trip to Oslo, Norway, to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 are on view in a new photo exhibit, "Crusader: Martin Luther King Jr.," on view now at the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. (Free, 515 Malcolm X Blvd., nypl.org)

J.R.R. Tolkien exhibit (through April)

The Morgan Library & Museum presents what it
Photo Credit: The Tolkien Estate

The Morgan Library & Museum presents what it says is the largest collection of Tolkien material ever assembled in the United States, "Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth," on Friday with 117 items borrowed from the Tolkien Archive at the Bodleian Libraries at Oxford and other lenders. (Tickets are $20 and free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m., The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Ave., themorgan.org)

'Power to the People' exhibit (through Feb. 28)

See the work of 11 artists depicting their
Photo Credit: Malcolm Pinckney/NYC Parks

See the work of 11 artists depicting their interpretations of public demonstration and protest in honor of Black History Month. Artists address historical and contemporary movements like an anti-Apartheid Rally in Central Park, Occupy Wall Street, the Women's March, and the NFL protests, among others. (Free, Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 p.m., 830 Fifth Ave., nycgovparks.org)

The Enigmatist (Fridays and Saturdays)

David Kwong, a magician and a crossword maker
Photo Credit: David Kwong

David Kwong, a magician and a crossword maker for the New York Times, is putting on an evening of puzzles, cryptology and illusions on Fridays and Saturdays in January, with two performances each night. ($85-$125, 7 and 9:30 p.m., The High Line Hotel, 180 10th Ave., enigmatistshow.com)

Free Flatiron Tour (every Sunday)

The Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID)
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) hosts free, 90-minute walking tours of the Flatiron District by professional guides each Sunday. You'll stop by the famous Flatiron building, the New York Life Insurance Building, the MetLife Clock Tower and more. (Free, 11 a.m., meet at the tip of the Flatiron building at 23rd Street, flatirondistrict.nyc)

Zola pop-up (through April 15)

If you're getting married, you may want to
Photo Credit: Zola

If you're getting married, you may want to stop by this pop-up shop by Zola -- an online wedding registry. The pop-up has wedding invitations, a registry, a 3D wedding cake topper printing machine, a wedding playlist booth and even CBD treats inside its "chill lounge." If you want to, you could even get married there -- all of the store's associates are ordained. No joke. (Free entry, Monday -- Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., 168 Fifth Ave., zola.com)

Learn how NYC inspired a dance icon (through March 30)

The Tony- and Academy Award-winning Jerome Robbins may
Photo Credit: Jonathan Blanc

The Tony- and Academy Award-winning Jerome Robbins may have influenced the art of dance, but his work shows his style was heavily shaped by New York City. The exhibit, "Voice of My City: Jerome Robbins and New York," takes a look at how the sounds, sights and personality of the Big Apple are either vaguely or clearly present in the man's creations. (Free, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza, nypl.org)

Take advantage of the igloos

Yes, it's cold outside, but that doesn't mean
Photo Credit: 230 Fifth

Yes, it's cold outside, but that doesn't mean you can't still eat and imbibe out there. Many New York City venues, bars and restaurants offer heated outdoor space in heated igloos, yurts and tents. From 230 Fifth's many lit-up igloos to Nowaday's heated yurts and mobile sauna, there are a number of options to consider when you want to go out.

Head to the roller disco

Dreamland Roller Disco opened a 15,000 square-foot indoor
Photo Credit: Dreamland Roller Disco

Dreamland Roller Disco opened a 15,000 square-foot indoor roller rink at Industry City on Dec. 7 that hosts hula hoop hour, skating and dance classes for kids and adults, and themed dress-up roller disco every Friday through April 2. This is the first time Dreamland will be inside in about a decade (it's usually in Prospect Park in the summers), so forget the cold and skate on.

'Drag Race All Star' viewing party (Sundays)

If you're a
Photo Credit: VH1

If you're a "Drag Race" fan, head to Loverboy Bar NYC in the East Village for a weekly viewing party hosted by Siren Starlite, Jacob Shoemaker and the creative collective Witch House. (8 p.m., 127 Avenue C, facebook.com)

Dive into Warhol at the Whitney (through March 31)

In what the Whitney is describing as its
Photo Credit: JUSTIN LANE/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutters/JUSTIN LANE/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock

In what the Whitney is describing as its largest monographic exhibition yet, this look back at the works of Andy Warhol is curated to show how the artist moved forward from a 1968 assassination attempt to grow, take even more risks and venture into creatives places even he hadn't considered. "Andy Warhol -- From A to B and Back Again" features works and materials found following his death in 1987, demonstrating that a man whose work often seemed before his time may is still extraordinarily relevant. ($25, Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St., whitney.org)

Free day at the Whitney Museum (Fridays)

Pay what you want to get into the
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

Pay what you want to get into the Whitney on Friday evenings. The museum has 63,000 square feet of exhibition space and has about 15,000 pieces of work by artists like Willem de Kooning, Edward Hopper, Georgia O'Keeffe and others. (7 to 10 p.m., 99 Gansevoort St., facebook.com)

Drag Queen Brunch (every Sunday)

Make your brunch a little more glamorous with
Photo Credit: Molly Tavoletti

Make your brunch a little more glamorous with Toro Loco's Sunday Drag Queen Brunch, featuring performances from the city's best drag queens and live music, like electronic saxophonist @livesax. For $50 per person, you'll get two hours of unlimited share plates and up to five signature brunch cocktails each. (15 Stone St., 917-262-0444, toroloconyc.com)

Tour Ellis Island's hospital

Empty for nearly 70 years, this space, best-known
Photo Credit: Untapped Cities | Augustin Pasquet

Empty for nearly 70 years, this space, best-known as an entrance point for turn-of-the-last-century European immigrants, also has a history of holding the ill who arrived but weren't deemed healthy enough to enter. This around two-hour tour of the century-old disease wards shows how those treated and held here ate, lived and, sometimes, died. Dress for the weather; closed-toe shoes are mandatory. Not wheelchair-accessible; children must be 10 or older. ($75, 2 p.m. most Saturdays and Sundays until the end of 2018, Ellis Island: Statue of Liberty National Monument, untappedcities.com)

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