Since taking office on Jan. 20, 2017, President Donald Trump has managed to fill many of the top positions across his administration, some of which he's even filled twice.

But with more than 1,000 appointments that will need to be confirmed by the Senate, it will take some time before the president has finished making announcements.

Here's a look at Trump's choices for Cabinet roles and other top appointments, including Jared Kushner, Rex Tillerson, Steve Bannon and Kellyanne Conway.

Dr. Scott Gottlieb: Food and Drug Administration commissioner

Trump nominated Dr. Scott Gottlieb to lead the

Trump nominated Dr. Scott Gottlieb to lead the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a White House official confirmed on Friday, March 10, 2017. Gottlieb, 44, is a resident fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute think tank and a partner at a large venture capital fund.

(Credit: Handout / The American Enterprise Institute)

H.R. McMaster: National security adviser

Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster was named Trump's national
Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster was named Trump's national security adviser on Feb. 20, 2017, just one week after Michael Flynn resigned from the position amid questions over his contacts with Russia before Trump's inauguration. He is a highly regarded military tactician and strategic thinker, but his selection surprised some observers who wondered how McMaster, who is known for questioning authority, would deal with a White House that has not welcomed criticism. (Credit: Reuters / Kevin Lamarque)

Keith Kellogg: National Security Council chief of staff

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg was appointed as

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg was appointed as chief of staff to the National Security Council on Feb. 20, 2017. Kellogg had previously been appointed to the role of acting national security adviser following the resignation of retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn on Feb. 13. He served in the military for 36 years.

Flynn, who served as an adviser to Trump on national security issues during his campaign, was one of Trump's first appointments.

(Credit: Reuters / Carlo Allegri)

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R. Alexander Acosta: Labor secretary

R. Alexander Acosta was named Trump's nominee for
R. Alexander Acosta was named Trump's nominee for secretary of labor on Feb. 16, 2017, a day after the president's first choice for the job, Andrew Puzder, withdrew his name from consideration. Acosta, Trump's first Hispanic nominee, is a former National Labor Relations Board member and current dean of the Florida International University College of Law in Miami. Before returning to the private sector, he had a decades-long public service career, serving in three presidentially appointed and Senate-confirmed positions. (Credit: Getty Images / Joe Raedle)

Rod Rosenstein: Deputy attorney general

Trump selected Rod Rosenstein as his nominee for
Trump selected Rod Rosenstein as his nominee for deputy attorney general, the White House said on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. The move comes one day after the president fired acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates, an appointee of former President Barack Obama who refused to enforce Trump's executive order on an immigrant and refugee travel ban. Trump's choice for U.S. attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has not yet been confirmed by the Senate. (Credit: Getty Images / Mark Wilson)

Philip Bilden: Navy secretary

Trump nominated Philip Bilden, a former military intelligence
Trump nominated Philip Bilden, a former military intelligence officer and private equity executive, for Navy secretary on Jan. 25, 2017. Bilden has broad business experience in Asia, specifically with China, but does not have past government experience. Trump has vowed to increase the number of the country's Navy ships from 290 to 350 ships, a move aides say is aimed at countering China's rapid rise as a military power in the Asia-Pacific. (Credit: Getty Images / Nicholas Kamm)

Maureen Ohlhausen: Acting chair of Federal Trade Commission

Maureen Ohlhausen, who is a commissioner of the
Maureen Ohlhausen, who is a commissioner of the Federal Trade Commission, was designated by Trump to be acting chairwoman of the FTC on Jan. 25, 2107. The appointment was made by a White House order, the FTC said. Ohlhausen, a Republican, became a commissioner in April 2012. The commission works with the Justice Department to prevent businesses from using anti-competitive, deceptive or fraudulent practices. (Credit: Getty Images / Nicholas Kamm)

James Comey: FBI director

Trump said he would keep FBI Director James
Trump said he would keep FBI Director James Comey in his post, the New York Times reported on Jan. 24, 2017. Comey has served as director of the FBI since September 2013 when he was appointed by then-President Barack Obama. He received criticism from Democrats when he announced that the FBI was reopening an inquiry into Hillary Clinton's emails 11 days before the presidential election. The FBI is currently investigating the potential ties between Trump aides and the Russian government. (Credit: Getty Images / Saul Loeb)

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Heather Wilson: Air Force secretary

Trump announced on Jan. 23, 2017, that he
Trump announced on Jan. 23, 2017, that he will nominate former Rep. Heather Wilson for Air Force secretary. Wilson, the first female military veteran to be elected to Congress, represented New Mexico from 1998 to 2009. She graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1982 and served as an officer for multiple years. Wilson was also a member of the National Security Council staff under former President George H.W. Bush. She currently serves as the president of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. Above, Wilson with former President George W. Bush in 2006. (Credit: Getty Images / Paul J. Richards)

Woody Johnson: Ambassador to the United Kingdom

New York Jets owner Woody Johnson was chosen

New York Jets owner Woody Johnson was chosen as Trump's ambassador to the United Kingdom,Tthe New York Times reported on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017.

Trump referred to Johnson as "ambassador" and said he was "going to St. James" during remarks at a luncheon in Washington. He also congratulated Johnson on the apparent appointment.

The position is considered a plum assignment and is typically given to a wealthy campaign donor.

The billionaire businessman is one of a dozen heirs to the Johnson & Johnson fortune.

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Dominick Reuter)

Sonny Perdue: Secretary of agriculture

Trump named former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as
Trump named former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as his nominee for secretary of agriculture on Jan. 19, 2017. Perdue, 70, served on Trump's agricultural advisory committee during his presidential campaign. He was the governor of Georgia from 2003 to 2011. His nomination completes Trump's proposed Cabinet just one day before his inauguration. (Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Bryan R. Smith)

David Shulkin: Secretary of Veterans Affairs

Trump announced his selection for Secretary of Veterans

Trump announced his selection for Secretary of Veterans Affairs during a news conference at Trump Tower on Jan. 11, 2017. David Shulkin, a physician, has served as undersecretary at the department since his confirmation, during the Obama administration, in June 2015.

Shulkin was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 13, 2017.

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Dominick Reuter)

Jared Kushner: Senior adviser to the president

Trump named his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as a

Trump named his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as a senior White House adviser, the transition team announced on Jan. 9, 2017. Kushner will work alongside Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and Chief Strategist Stephen Bannon to carry out Trump's agenda, the transition team said.

Kushner chose to forego his salary while serving in the administration, according to the transition team. He is expected to work on trade deals and the Middle East, a transition official said.

The move could potentially violate anti-nepotism laws and raises questions over conflicts of interest for Kushner, who is a real estate developer.

(Credit: Getty Images / Spencer Platt)

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Dan Coats: Director of national intelligence

Trump chose Dan Coats, a former senator from

Trump chose Dan Coats, a former senator from Indiana, as his director of national intelligence, two senior transition officials said on Jan. 5, 2017. Coats, 73, is a traditional conservative from Indiana who just finished a six-year term in the Senate. He was also a U.S. ambassador to Germany for Republican President George W. Bush.

Coats was confirmed by the Senate on March 15, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Katie Walsh: Deputy chief of staff

Katie Walsh, the former chief of staff for

Katie Walsh, the former chief of staff for Reince Priebus at the Republican National Committee, was appointed as deputy chief of staff to the White House, Trump said Jan. 4, 2017. Walsh will continue to work closely with Priebus, who was previously appointed as Trump's chief of staff.

Trump also announced that Rick Dearborn, chief of staff to Sen. Jeff Sessions -- who Trump nominated to be attorney general -- will serve as deputy chief of staff for legislative, intergovernmental affairs and implementation. Joe Hagin, who served in the administrations of George W. Bush, George H. W. Bush and Ronald Reagan, will serve as deputy chief of staff for operations, Trump said.

(Credit: Getty Images / Zach Gibson)

Jay Clayton: Securities and Exchange Commission chairman

Trump nominated Jay Clayton to head the Securities

Trump nominated Jay Clayton to head the Securities and Exchange Commission, which provides oversight of the stock market, his transition team said Jan. 4, 2017. Clayton is a partner at Sullivan & Cromwell LLP, a prominent law firm that helps businesses navigate the federal regulations Clayton would be tasked with overseeing at the SEC.

"If confirmed, we are going to work together with key stakeholders in the financial system to make sure we provide investors and our companies with the confidence to invest together in America," Clayton said in a statement.

(Credit: Getty Images / Jim Watson)

Robert Lighthizer: U.S. trade representative

Trump announced on Jan. 3, 2017, that he
Trump announced on Jan. 3, 2017, that he nominated Robert Lighthizer as the U.S. trade representative. Lighthizer, a trade lawyer, previously served under President Ronal Reagan as the deputy U.S. trade representative. He is also a partner at the law firm Skadden Arps. Lighthizer will work with the secretary of commerce (Trump has nominated Wilbur Ross for the position) to shrink the country's trade deficit, strengthen the manufacturing base and keep jobs in America, Trump said in a statement. (Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Don Emmert)

Thomas Bossert: Homeland security aide

Thomas Bossert was named Trump's homeland security aide,
Thomas Bossert was named Trump's homeland security aide, the transition team announced on Dec. 27, 2016. He will advise on security and counterterrorism issues, according to a statement. Bossert was formerly the deputy homeland security adviser to President George W. Bush. (Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Sean Spicer, Hope Hicks, Dan Scavino: Senior communications team

Trump's transition team announced on Dec. 22, 2016,

Trump's transition team announced on Dec. 22, 2016, that Sean Spicer (pictured left), Republican National Committee communications director, was named press secretary and assistant to the president. In the same statement, the transition team revealed that Trump's campaign press secretary, Hope Hicks (pictured right), was named assistant to the president and director of strategic communications. Also named to the press team were Jason Miller as assistant to the president and director of communications and Dan Scavino as assistant to the president and director of social media.

"Sean, Hope, Jason and Dan have been key members of my team during the campaign and transition," Trump said in a statement. "I am excited they will be leading the team that will communicate my agenda that will Make America Great Again."

But on Dec. 24, Miller announced he would not accept the position offered by Trump. Miller, who was Trump's communications director for the transition team, said in a statement that he and his wife were expecting their second daughter in January and that his family needed to take priority over career moves.

(Credit: Getty Images composite)

Kellyanne Conway: Counselor to the president

Kellyanne Conway was appointed as counselor to the
Kellyanne Conway was appointed as counselor to the president, Trump said on Dec. 22, 2016. In this role, she will serve as a close adviser to Trump and work with senior leadership to execute the administration's agenda. Conway has served as a senior member of Trump's transition team and acted as his campaign manager for the final leg of his campaign, helping him win the election. (Credit: Getty Images / Spencer Platt)

Carl Icahn: Special adviser to the president

Billionaire Carl Icahn accepted a position as special
Billionaire Carl Icahn accepted a position as special adviser to the president on regulatory reform, Trump's transition team said on Dec. 21, 2016. A native of Far Rockaway, Queens, and the chairman of his NYC-based Icahn Enterprises, Icahn began his Wall Street career in 1961, according to a news release. Icahn will not take a salary for his service, a Trump transition team aide told Reuters. (Credit: Getty Images / Mat Szwajkos)

Mick Mulvaney: White House Office of Management and Budget director

Trump chose South Carolina Rep. Mick Mulvaney to

Trump chose South Carolina Rep. Mick Mulvaney to be director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, a position which will require Senate confirmation. Mulvaney, 49, is a fiscal conservative and was an outspoken critic of former House Speaker John Boehner, who resigned in 2015 amid opposition from fellow Republicans who were members of the House Freedom Caucus.

Mulvaney was confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 14, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Chip Somodevilla)

David Friedman: Ambassador to Israel

David Friedman, left, was chosen as Trump's nominee
David Friedman, left, was chosen as Trump's nominee for U.S. ambassador to Israel, the transition team announced on Dec. 15, 2016. Friedman has been one of Trump's top advisers on the U.S.-Israel relationship during his campaign. He speaks Hebrew fluently and is a founding partner of the law firm Kasowitz, Benson, Torres & Friedman LLP. (Credit: EPA / Abir Sultan)

Ryan Zinke: Secretary of the Interior

Trump selected Rep. Ryan Zinke as his Interior

Trump selected Rep. Ryan Zinke as his Interior secretary, his transition team announced Dec. 15, 2016. The first-term Republican from Montana is a proponent of keeping public lands under federal ownership, putting him at odds with some in the GOP. Zinke, 55, is also a former Navy SEAL commander.

Zinke was confirmed by the Senate on March 1, 2017.

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Kena Betancur)

Rick Perry: Energy secretary

Trump chose former Texas Gov. Rick Perry as

Trump chose former Texas Gov. Rick Perry as his nominee for energy secretary, the transition team said Dec. 14, 2016. The selection of Perry, who is from a leading oil-producing state, is further indication that the Trump administration may be friendly toward the fossil fuel industry. Perry proposed eliminating the Energy Department, which is responsible for the country's energy policies and oversees the nuclear weapons program, during his unsuccessful bid for president in 2011. He was also among Trump's Republican rivals in the 2016 presidential race, during which he called Trump "a cancer on conservatism." During a debate, Trump took aim at Perry's appearance, saying, "He put on glasses so people will think he's smart."

Perry was approved by the full Senate on March 2, 2017.

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Kena Betancur)

Rex Tillerson: Secretary of state

Trump announced Rex Tillerson as his nominee for

Trump announced Rex Tillerson as his nominee for secretary of state on Dec. 13, 2016. Tillerson is the chief executive of Exxon Mobil who has close ties to the Russian government. In 2013, Russian President Vladimir Putin awarded Tillerson with Russia's Order of Friendship, one of the country's highest civilian honors. Lawmakers from both major parties have raised questions about Tillerson's relationship with Russia, and his confirmation in the Senate is not expected to be easy.

Tillerson was confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 1, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images)

Stephen Miller: Senior advisor to the president for policy

Stephen Miller was chosen as Trump's senior adviser
Stephen Miller was chosen as Trump's senior adviser to the president for policy, the transition team announced on Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016. Miller has been Trump's top adviser on policy since January 2016 and has served as a key adviser to several members of Congress, including Trump's choice for attorney general, Jeff Sessions. (Credit: Getty Images / John Gurzinski)

Gary Cohn: White House National Economic Council

Trump officially nominated Gary Cohn, the president of
Trump officially nominated Gary Cohn, the president of Goldman Sachs, as director of the National Economic Council on Dec. 12, 2016. The selection of Cohn, 56, to managing the country's economy comes despite Trump's repeated campaign criticism of Goldman Sachs, which he said was part of a financial system that had hurt the working class. (Credit: Getty Images / Bryan R. Smith)

Linda McMahon: Administrator of the Small Business Administration

Linda McMahon was chosen as Trump's nomination for

Linda McMahon was chosen as Trump's nomination for administrator of the Small Business Administration, transition team officials said on Dec. 7, 2016. McMahon is the co-founder and former CEO of WWE wrestling. She is also the current co-founder and CEO of Women's Leadership Live LLC, which aims to help women start or expand their own businesses. The Small Business Administration extends loans to small businesses and makes sure they get a percentage of federal contracts.

McMahon was confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 14, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Scott Pruitt: Environmental Protection Agency administrator

Trump selected Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to

Trump selected Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, a Trump transition team source said Dec. 7, 2016. Pruitt has been a harsh opponent of President Barack Obama's measures and regulations to curb climate change. He has launched multiple lawsuits against regulations put forward by the EPA. "The American people are tired of seeing billions of dollars drained from our economy due to unnecessary EPA regulations, and I intend to run this agency in a way that fosters both responsible protection of the environment and freedom for American businesses," Pruitt said.

Pruitt was confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 17, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Eduardo Munoz Alvarez)

John Kelly: Secretary of homeland security

Trump nominated retired Marine Gen. John Kelly to

Trump nominated retired Marine Gen. John Kelly to lead the Department of Homeland Security, his transition team said on Dec. 12, 2016. Kelly is the former head of the U.S. Southern Command and was responsible for the country's military activities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Kelly, whose son was killed in combat in Afghanistan in 2010, also led troops in western Iraq.

Kelly's nomination was confirmed by the Senate on Jan. 20, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Norberto Duarte)

Terry Branstad: Ambassador to China

Trump selected Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad as the
Trump selected Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad as the next U.S. ambassador to China, a transition official said on Dec. 7, 2016. Brandstad called Chinese President Xi Jinping a "longtime friend" when Xi visited Iowa in February 2012, and Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang called Branstad an "old friend" of China when asked about a report on the appointment. Because of Branstad's relationship with China, his appointment may show a willingness of Trump to ease trade tensions between the United States and China. (Credit: Getty Images / Scott Olson)

Ben Carson: Secretary of housing and urban development

Former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson was nominated

Former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson was nominated to be secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Trump's transition team announced on Dec. 5, 2016. After Carson dropped out of the presidential race in early March, he put his support behind Trump, despite criticism of him in the past. Carson is a retired neurosurgeon who has never held political office before. Trump had discussed the job with Carson before Thanksgiving, but -- despite his own presidential run -- Carson initially indicated reluctance to take a position in the incoming administration because of his lack of experience in federal government.

Carson was confirmed by the Senate on March 2, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

James Mattis: Defense secretary

Trump nominated retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis

Trump nominated retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis for defense secretary, his transition team said on Dec. 6, 2016. Mattis, known as "Mad Dog," is renowned for his tough talk and battlefield experience in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is also a revered figure in the Marine Corps and is known for his distrust of Iran.

Mattis was confirmed to be defense secretary on Jan. 20, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Steven Mnuchin: Treasury secretary

Trump announced his nomination of Steven Mnuchin as

Trump announced his nomination of Steven Mnuchin as Treasury secretary on Nov. 30, 2016. Mnuchin worked at Goldman Sachs for 17 years before launching his own hedge fund, the Dune Capital Management. He has invested in Hollywood movies, including "Avatar," "Mad Max: Fury Road" and "Suicide Squad." He also served as Trump's presidential campaign finance chairman.

The Senate confirmed Mnuchin as Treasury secretary on Feb. 13, 2017.

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Eduardo Munoz Alvarez)

Wilbur Ross: Secretary of commerce

Wilbur Ross was nominated to be the secretary

Wilbur Ross was nominated to be the secretary of the Department of Commerce, the transition team announced on Nov. 30, 2016. Ross is an investor and businessman who was the head of investment banking company Rothschild Inc. for 25 years. Ross is worth $2.5 billion, according to Forbes Magazine. He also served as an economic policy adviser to Trump during his campaign.

Ross was confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 27, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Todd Ricketts: Deputy secretary of commerce

Todd Ricketts, the co-owner of the Chicago Cubs,
Todd Ricketts, the co-owner of the Chicago Cubs, was nominated to be the deputy secretary of commerce, the transition team announced on Nov. 30, 2016. Ricketts' family reportedly donated money to the Ours Principles PAC, which had a goal of defeating Trump, during the Republican primaries. Trump called them out on Twitter in February, saying "I hear the Rickets family, who own the Chicago Cubs, are secretly spending $'s against me. They better be careful, they have a lot to hide!" Todd Ricketts became a Trump ally later in the campaign. (Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Elaine Chao: Transportation secretary

Trump named Elaine Chao as his transportation secretary,

Trump named Elaine Chao as his transportation secretary, transition team officials said on Nov. 29, 2016. Chao previously served as the labor secretary under former President George W. Bush. She was the first Asian-American woman to hold a Cabinet position. Chao is also married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Chao was confirmed by the Senate on Jan. 31, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Jim Watson)

Tom Price: Secretary of health and human services

Georgia Rep. Tom Price was chosen to be

Georgia Rep. Tom Price was chosen to be the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, Trump's transition team announced Nov. 29, 2016. Price worked as an orthopedic surgeon before entering politics. He has been a vocal critic of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. "Under Obamacare, the American people are paying more for health care and getting less - less access, less quality, and fewer choices," he said in a statement after introducing legislation to repeal Obamacare in May.

Price was confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 8, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong)

Seema Verma: Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Seema Verma was selected to be the administrator
Seema Verma was selected to be the administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, an agency that oversees government health programs and insurance standards, the Trump transition team said Nov. 29, 2016. Verma is the president, CEO and founder of SVC Inc., a health care policy consulting company. Verma previously worked with Mike Pence in Indiana to expand Medicaid coverage for the state's poor using federal funding. (Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Don McGahn: White House counsel

Trump named attorney Donald McGahn his White House
Trump named attorney Donald McGahn his White House counsel, a senior transition official said on Nov. 25, 2016. A partner at law firm Jones Day and former chairman of the Federal Election Commission, McGahn served as counsel to Trump during his presidential campaign. He has also previously served as counsel to the National Republican Congressional Committee, which oversees campaigns for the House of Representatives. The White House Counsel's office advises the president on the legality of proposed executive orders and legislation passed by Congress and vets potential administration appointees. (Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

K.T. McFarland: Deputy national security adviser

Kathleen Troia
Kathleen Troia "K.T." McFarland, left, was named deputy national security adviser. McFarland served as an aide to Henry Kissinger in the 1970s and served in three Republican administrations. McFarland is also a national security analyst for Fox News. (Credit: Getty Images / Eugene Gologursky)

Betsy DeVos: Secretary of the Dept. of Education

Betsy DeVos was selected as Trump's nomination for

Betsy DeVos was selected as Trump's nomination for secretary of the Department of Education, transition officials said. The decision comes after DeVos met with Trump at his International Golf Club in Bedminster Township, New Jersey, on Nov. 19, 2016. Among several other organizations she works with, DeVos, of Michigan, is chairman of the American Federation for Children. The nonprofit organization advocates for school choice reforms, focusing on a parent's right to choose which school their child attends through scholarship tax credit programs, education savings accounts and school vouchers.

DeVos was confirmed as education secretary by the Senate on Feb. 7, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Nikki Haley: U.S. ambassador to the United Nations

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley was selected to

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley was selected to be the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. She has been the governor of South Carolina since 2011, but has little international experience. Haley had previously supported Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio in the Republican primaries, and she criticized Trump for his harsh rhetoric about immigration and for not speaking forcefully enough against white supremacists. In the rebuttal to President Obama's State of the Union address in January, Haley, the daughter of Indian immigrants, appeared to allude to Trump. "During anxious times, it can be tempting to follow the siren call of the angriest voices," she said. "We must resist that temptation."

Haley was confirmed by the Senate on Jan. 24, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Jim Watson)

Mike Pompeo: CIA director

Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo was selected to be

Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo was selected to be Trump's CIA director, transition officials said in November. Pompeo graduated first in his class from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and served as an active-duty cavalry officer in the U.S Army. He also has a joint degree from Harvard Law School. A member of the House of Representatives Intelligence Committee, Pompeo, 52, was first elected in the 2010 tea party wave from the congressional district centered on his hometown of Wichita. Pompeo is also a vocal critic of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server as secretary of state and her handling of the 2012 attacks on U.S. posts in Benghazi, Libya.

Pompeo's nomination was confirmed by the Senate on Jan. 23, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Win McNamee)

Jeff Sessions: Attorney general

Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions was chosen to be

Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions was chosen to be the U.S. attorney general, transition officials said. Sessions served as the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Alabama and Alabama attorney general before being elected to the U.S. Senate in 1996. Trump's selection of Sessions angered civil rights activists, particularly over his stance on immigration.

Sessions was confirmed by the Senate on Feb. 8, 2017.

(Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong)

Steve Bannon: Chief strategist and counselor

Former head of the website Breitbart News Steve
Former head of the website Breitbart News Steve Bannon was selected to be Trump's chief strategist and counselor. The Virginia native served as a Navy officer for seven years and worked as the chief of naval operations at the Pentagon under President Ronald Reagan, but otherwise has no political experience beyond Trump's presidential campaign. One of Trump's more controversial appointments, critics have accused Bannon of being an anti-Semite. (Credit: Getty Images / Drew Angerer)

Reince Priebus: Chief of staff

Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus was named
Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus was named Trump's chief of staff in November. Born in New Jersey and raised in Wisconsin, Priebus was the RNC's Wisconsin state party chairman before winning the RNC chairman position in 2011. The choice of Priebus was seen as a conciliatory signal of Trump's willingness to work with Congress after he takes office on Jan. 20. (Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong)