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LIVE UPDATES: Curfew back in effect in New York City as protests wind down for day

A demonstrator holds a placard during a protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Brooklyn, on June 6, 2020. (REUTERS/Jeenah Moon)

From Harlem to Brooklyn, Midtown to Queens and every direction in between, tens of thousands of New Yorkers spent Saturday peacefully marching in search of an end to police brutality and racial injustice following the May 25 police-involved murder of Minneapolis resident George Floyd.

Marchers sang, chanted and paraded in peace at numerous demonstrations across the boroughs. There were no reports of major incidents or disturbances as of 8 p.m., when the curfew went into effect.

Some rain fell on protesters at the corner of 5th Avenue and 34th Street, but the march went on. A band provide music to keep things moving.

Supporters along the march route banged pots and shouted cheers from their apartments above the street.

Protesters heading along 7th Avenue in Manhattan on June 6, 2020. (Photo by Emily Davenport)

Early this morning, protesters gathered in Queens at Gantry Plaza State Park calling for reform.

Protesters take a knee in honor of George Floyd and other victims of police brutality in Long Island City, Queens on June 6, 2020. (Photo by Dean Moses)

There was a protest outside Archbishop Molloy High School in Briarwood, Queens among students and alumni who are fed up with reports of racism and intolerance at the academic institution.

Another protest on the steps of the Queens County Criminal Court House had marchers singing “Happy Birthday” to Breonna Taylor, a victim of police brutality in Kentucky, who would’ve turned 27 on June 5.

The big crowd was last seen heading down Queens Boulevard in Forest Hills, making their case for justice known.

In Brooklyn, thousands of protesters made their way from Grand Army Plaza to Barclays Center at about 2 p.m. with massive demonstrations continuing along Flatbush Avenue.

According to unconfirmed reports, nearly 15,000 people have participated thus far.

People participate in a protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. June 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jeenah Moon

Demonstrators gather to protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, at the Grand Army Plaza, in Brooklyn, on June 6, 2020. (REUTERS/Jeenah Moon)

Demonstrators hold placards at the Brooklyn Bridge during a protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Brooklyn on June 6, 2020. (REUTERS/Jeenah Moon)
Demonstrators take a knee outside Brooklyn’s Barclays Center on June 6, 2020 during a protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd. (REUTERS/Jeenah Moon)

The throng of marchers would stop at Cadman Plaza, then head over the Brooklyn Bridge to Manhattan for a rally outside Foley Square.

As they headed toward the Brooklyn Bridge, the NYPD blocked off their access to the roadway. The marchers had to then squeeze onto the pedestrian portion of the bridge, significantly slowing their walk.

A large group of marchers files slowly across the Brooklyn Bridge into Manhattan on June 6. NYPD barricades kept marchers confined to the pedestrian path over the bridge, slowing their movements considerably.

Just before 11 p.m. tonight, cops started closing in on protesters in Brooklyn who were out well past curfew. 

There was a report of an unidentified driver of an SUV driving through a crowd at the corner of Brooklyn Avenue and St. John’s Place in Crown Heights. There were no reported injuries so far.

But so far, there’s been little trouble between police and protesters in Brooklyn. A crowd of protesters returned to the front entrance of Barclays Center and were allowed to take a knee.

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