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Eat and Drink

Celtuce, crosnes, chicories and more vegetables that may be the new kale

Say goodbye to kale, there are new trendy vegetables on the market.

We spoke with Baldor, which provides some of New York City's top restaurants with their produce, to see what chefs are ordering this season.

New greens, citrus and more may replace kale on menus any day now. See what all the hype is about!

Celtuce

Celtuce is the newest green that has chefs
Photo Credit: Baldor

Celtuce is the newest green that has chefs excited! Slightly nutty but leafy like kale, celtuce is a fun substitute for the popular vegetable. Also referred to as stem lettuce, celery lettuce or asparagus lettuce, you can find this funky vegetable at markets in Chinatown or head to Fung Tu (22 Orchard St.) where Chef Jonathan Wu has whey poached celtuce with century egg, garlic chives, and dehydrated Doufu Ru on his cold plates menu.

Italian Chicories

These lettuce-like leaves are related to your favorite
Photo Credit: Baldor

These lettuce-like leaves are related to your favorite salad green (read: not kale) but have a bitter flavor, almost peppery. The hearty greens are available in several seasonal Italian varieties, including Puntarella, Castelfranco, Italian Tardivo, and Trevisano. To taste them, visit Locanda Verde, where Chef Andrew Carmellini is incorporating Castelfranco in his Autumn Insalata with bitter greens, speck, dried cherries and hazelnut ($16).

Heirloom Apples

Fujis and Galas are all over the grocery
Photo Credit: Baldor

Fujis and Galas are all over the grocery stores, but the real trend for the cold weather are smaller varietals of apples found regionally and internationally. Some of these ancient apples offer unique flavors not found in today's GMO Granny Smiths. Ask for heirloom apple pie at your local bakery!

Crosnes

We've been told the Japanese believe this small,
Photo Credit: Baldor

We've been told the Japanese believe this small, nutty tuber brings good luck. In 2004, The New York Times published a column entitled, "A Tuber So Homely Only a Chef Could Love It," in reference to crosnes. Also called Chinese artichoke, Japanese artichoke and knotroot, this root vegetable is comparable to a Jerusalem artichoke and will be used in dishes similarly.

Buddha's Hand Citron

Also called bushukan or fingered citron, this is
Photo Credit: FreshDirect

Also called bushukan or fingered citron, this is one of many exotic citrus fruits you should expect to see this season. It is used as a unique replacement for lemon zest, and you can also sauté the fruit with chicken or seafood. Try it for yourself; it's available on FreshDirect for $8.99/lb.

Sea Lettuce

Typically salad for mermaids, this under-the-sea delicacy is
Photo Credit: Thrive

Typically salad for mermaids, this under-the-sea delicacy is high in vitamins and has a positive environmental impact. The New Yorker ran a feature in its annual food issue predicting a future full of sea vegetables and algae on above-ground plates. Expect to see sea lettuce and algae in everything from salads to pizza toppings and even desserts. Algae cronut anyone? To try culinary algae without the seaweed texture, try cooking with Thrive Algae Oil.

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