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WalletHub releases a report that shows the states that are struggling most with hiring in 2022

People gather at the entrance for the New York State Department of Labor offices, which closed to the public due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in the Brooklyn borough of New York City
FILE PHOTO: People gather at the entrance for the New York State Department of Labor offices, which closed to the public due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, U.S., March 20, 2020. (REUTERS/Andrew Kelly)

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the labor force has been experiencing its slowest recovery since the recessions of World War II. 

WalletHub released a report on the struggles employers have with hiring, comparing all 50 states based on the rate of job openings from the last 12 months. New York City rates are 5.57%, ranked 4th in having the least struggles with hiring in the country. In contrast to New Jersey at 6.58% and Pennsylvania at 6.62%, the states rank at number 22 and number 8, respectively, on the list of states where it’s hardest to hire workers.

Experts explain why employers are having such difficulty filling these positions.

“I believe that the most difficult jobs to fill these days either require skills that most people lack or do not offer enough in terms of earnings, benefits and job satisfaction,” Priscilla Murolo, a Professor at Sarah Lawrence College, said. “Bear in mind as well that ‘essential workers’ have been overrepresented in the ranks of people killed or seriously disabled by COVID.”

Next, they discovered the main factors influencing the high turnover rates in the labor market.

“Real wages have risen somewhat, and some employers have begun to compete with new perks and benefits. In some cases, there are organized poaching from other companies,” Teresa Sullivan, President Emerita and University Professor, University of Virginia, said. “In addition, some jobs, especially those that are public-facing, are perceived to be so hazardous or unpleasant that workers are no longer willing to stay, even at higher wages.”

Sullivan continues, pointing out the best thing employers can do to retain employees. “Find out what the workers want and try to supply it. I would recommend two types of interviews: with long-term employees to find out why they stay, and with departing employees to find out what was more attractive about another job. This is a good time to get rid of harsh supervisory practices, arbitrary rules, and other irritants. Employers could also show more concern for the health and well-being of their workers.”

For more information visit, https://wallethub.com/edu/states-employers-hiring/101730

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