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Film Room Week 10: Comparing Seattle Seahawks, San Francisco 49ers' rushing attacks

A week after the Giants gave up 350 yards and five touchdowns on the ground to the Seattle Seahawks, they go up against another run-heavy offense: the San Francisco 49ers, who amassed 144 rushing yards and two touchdowns against the New Orleans Saints.

Both NFC West teams have their similarities: their offense features a mobile quarterback and a powerful, downhill running back that doesn't shy away from contact.

However, whereas the Seahawks simply like to control the line of scrimmage and let Marshawn Lynch barrel over defenders, the 49ers used a bit more complex of a scheme to create holes for Frank Gore against the Saints. Here are two plays -- one from the Giants' game against the Seahawks, and one from the 49ers' game against the Saints -- that show how two similar offenses could approach the same situation differently.

NYG VS. SEA, 4TH QUARTER: 2nd and Goal, 12:51 left, ball at NYG 3

The Seahawks come to the line in a
Photo Credit: NFL Game Rewind

The Seahawks come to the line in a shotgun formation with their “11” personnel (three receivers out wide, one tight end, one running back). Wide receiver Doug Baldwin motions across the field from left to right (shown in black).

Scheme-wise, this run is nothing special -- the
Photo Credit: NFL Game Rewind

Scheme-wise, this run is nothing special -- the Seahawks’ offensive line gets a great push off the line against the Giants’ defensive front and blows them backwards off the snap.

Once quarterback Russell Wilson hands the ball to
Photo Credit: NFL Game Rewind

Once quarterback Russell Wilson hands the ball to Lynch, it’s just Beast Mode being Beast Mode. Lynch bulls his way up the middle, breaking Jason Pierre-Paul’s tackle attempt en route to the 3-yard touchdown.

Now, let’s compare that run with what the 49ers did in a similar situation against the Saints just a few hours earlier.

SF vs. NO, 1ST QUARTER: 2nd and Goal, 13:05 left, ball at NO 4

The 49ers line up in a shotgun formation
Photo Credit: NFL Game Rewind

The 49ers line up in a shotgun formation with “11” personnel. Vernon Davis motions across the field from his tight end spot, then motions into the backfield ahead of Gore (shown in black).

This play is a read-option handoff. Colin Kaepernick
Photo Credit: NFL Game Rewind

This play is a read-option handoff. Colin Kaepernick sees that safety Kenny Vaccaro (circled in yellow) is staying home on the spy, so he decides to give the ball to Gore. In the above screengrab, it appears at first glance that Junior Galette -- an outside linebacker who lined up in a three-point stance for this play -- is left unblocked, meaning he potentially could blow the play up in the backfield. However, it’s not an issue because . . .

. . . Alex Boone pulls from his
Photo Credit: NFL Game Rewind

. . . Alex Boone pulls from his right guard spot and helps seal the edge. That allows Gore to get to the outside, with Davis serving as his lead blocker. The 49ers used this concept early against the Saints -- they started the game with five straight runs, and three of them involved Boone pulling to the left.

From there, Gore simply follows Davis into the
Photo Credit: NFL Game Rewind

From there, Gore simply follows Davis into the end zone for the 4-yard TD.

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