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Fake subway ad on N train skewers Trump attorney Michael Cohen

The poster was spotted on an N train near the 34th Street-Herald Square station in Manhattan Wednesday morning.

A fake ad for Michael Cohen, President Donald

A fake ad for Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's personal attorney, was found on an N train in Manhattan on Wednesday. Photo Credit: Steven Sobel

A fake advertisement mocking President Donald Trump’s longtime personal attorney gave a couple of N train riders a laugh Wednesday morning.

The sassy poster poking fun at embattled attorney Michael Cohen was spotted by riders near the 34th Street-Herald Square station in Manhattan around 9 a.m., according to rider Steven Sobel.

“Got problems? Call ‘The Fixer,’” the fake ad says, listing Cohen’s areas of expertise as “hush payments, physical threats, pay off porn stars and Playboy bunnies.”

Sobel said he was on his daily route to work and almost didn’t realize it was a fake.

“I did a double take like Paul Rudd in ‘Wet Hot American Summer,’” Sobel said of his realization. “Another person chuckled when I snapped the photo, but it wasn’t a crowded train. It made the email rounds at work though.”

Cohen, who paid porn star Stormy Daniels $130,000 to keep quiet about her alleged affair with Trump, has made national headlines after federal authorities executed search warrants last week at his home, office and safe deposit box, seizing his files, hard drives and electronic devices. The federal government says the raids are in connection with an investigation into his personal business.

Whoever is behind the prank ad was thorough. The website listed on the ad is real and further elaborates on his "expertise." The phone number also is active, with an automated system that allows you to press one "if you need hush payments made," press two "if you need to threaten someone with physical violence" and press three "if you're the president of the United States."

An MTA spokesman said the agency will remove a fake advertisement when they are alerted to its location.

There have been other, MTA-related fake ads in recent months, including a poster that falsely announced chairman Joe Lhota’s resignation and a fake service update that read, “Your train is delayed, January 1 - December 31. Days. Nights. Weekends.” that was put up at the Bleecker Street station.

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