Long-running NYC women’s group changes name, keeps its focus

Long-running NYC women’s group changes name, keeps its focus

Women Creating Change wants to reach women from underserved communities.

The group formerly known as the Women's City Club of New York has changed its name to Women Creating Change. Pictured from left are board members Margaret Cianci and Deborah Martin Owens, CEO/President Carole Wacey and board member Heidi Revis.
The group formerly known as the Women’s City Club of New York has changed its name to Women Creating Change. Pictured from left are board members Margaret Cianci and Deborah Martin Owens, CEO/President Carole Wacey and board member Heidi Revis. Photo Credit: Li Yakira Cohen

A century-old organization is switching its name, but not its focus on empowering women.

The Women’s City Club of New York will now be known as Women Creating Change.

Its leaders say the membership-based group will make a point of reaching out to women in underserved communities.

“Women in New York City have the passion, the promise and the potential to change and improve New York City by becoming civically engaged,” WCC president and CEO Carole Wacey said in a statement. “Now, WCC will focus our work on reaching out to all corners of our city to provide resources and access so that all women can be changemakers in their communities and in their lives.”

The group started in 1915, taking on issues such as women in sweatshops, poor living conditions in tenements and voting rights.

Notable members have included Eleanor Roosevelt (when she was the first lady of New York State), journalist Ida Tarbell and labor leader Frances Perkins, who became the first female Cabinet member when former President Franklin Delano Roosevelt appointed her secretary of labor.

In recent years, the nonprofit has conducted research and advocacy on topics such as homelessness and HIV/AIDS. Its new primary mission is getting more women involved in the civic life of New York City.

“There are many in this city who may have the desire to improve their lives and create change in their communities, but who don’t know the first thing about where to start, or how to get involved,” Heidi Reavis, who chairs the group’s board of directors, said in a statement. “We are aiming to provide more people with tools and a platform for creating change.”

Lisa L. Colangelo