Something's brewing in the West Village.

Chef David Santos of Louro has been cooking up a stew since August 2014 -- and hasn't stopped since! After researching starter recipes like sourdough and kimchee, Santos was inspired to create a basic recipe starter of his own: Perpetual Stew.

Used in classic dishes from Asian culture like Japanese Ramen and Vietnamese Pho, slow-cooking, conglomerative stews and soups date back centuries. Even Native Americans would cook a big, ever-evolving stew to feed a tribe using whatever was handy.

The Perpetual Stew, which is its own twitter feed (@perpetual_stew), started with a basic bone broth and has evolved to use whatever ingredients the kitchen does not serve in restaurant dishes. "It's been fed vegetables, roasted bones, meats and trimmings," said Santos. "The whole premise is to use what we have on hand. It gets fed something different everyday so the base is always kind of changing."

Perpetual Stew has been used to create to main dishes on Luoro's menu: a base for duck ramen and a garlic soup with bread and smoked oil. Due to its ever-changing nature, the dish evolves and tastes unique each day.

In addition to the stew's full flavor, Santos raves about the health benefits. "There's a theory that the vitamins and collagens that come out of the bones and minerals from vegetables can help fight off colds, help you feel fuller," he said. "It's also a great way to make you feel full and nourished without overeating." And it's good for your nails and hair!

Inside the Louro kitchen, Santos drinks a pint of Perpetual Stew each day, not just to taste its new evolution, but to reap in the health benefits and enjoy the taste. None of the kitchen staff has gotten sick this winter -- so perhaps this soup really is a good medicine! 

As of this week, Louro has started serving the Perpetual Stew broth at the bar, similar to East Village broth sensation Brodo.

Starting at noon, customers can enjoy take away pints of Perpetual stew and when the restaurant opens at 5:30 p.m., the bar will begin serving portions of the hot soup for $5. 

Santos has created three renditions of the Perpetual Stew to serve as broth: Korean-inspired with in-house fermented kimchee), Japanese-inspired with homemade soy sauce, vinegar, mirin and scallions and Portuguese-inspired with braised greens, black pepper, honey and olive oil.

It's so nice, you really can't taste it twice, because a fish head one day and a beef rip the next may totally change the flavor! Try it for yourself at Louro, 142 W. 10th St.